Search results

Jump to: navigation, search
  • Free Documentation License makes sure that the submitted version and its derivative works will always remain freely distributable and reproducible. See Wikibooks:Copyrights
    4 KB (439 words) - 18:24, 24 December 2015
  • expression the freedom to make changes and improvements, and to distribute derivative works These freedoms may not be restricted, and attempting to restrict
    8 KB (1,082 words) - 22:31, 17 June 2012
  • The second derivative, or second order derivative, is the derivative of the derivative of a function. The derivative of the function may be denoted by
    2 KB (314 words) - 01:05, 22 March 2012
  • To find the derivative of sin(θ). . Clearly, the limit of the first term is since is a continuous function. Write k = h⁄2; the second term is then .
    858 bytes (49 words) - 01:47, 27 November 2014
  • To find the derivative of cos(θ). . As in the proof of Derivative of Sine, the limit of the first term is and the limit of the second term is 1. Thus
    183 bytes (38 words) - 17:44, 15 March 2011
  • made by others. This License is a kind of "copyleft", which means that derivative works of the document must themselves be free in the same sense. It complements
    22 KB (3,674 words) - 16:38, 31 July 2011
  • Since , we can find its derivative by the usual rule for differentiating a fraction: Similarly,
    96 bytes (15 words) - 12:59, 11 March 2011
  • Problems - Solutions - Terminology Figure 1.15: Estimation of the derivative, which is the slope of the tangent line. When point B approaches point
    2 KB (256 words) - 19:06, 7 August 2006
  • 3-dimensional Cartesian space coordinates. A comma derivative is just a convenient notation for a partial derivative with respect to one of the coordinates. Here
    774 bytes (121 words) - 03:03, 25 August 2009
  • The definition of a Derivative of a Function Example Use the limit definition with the given function
    103 bytes (17 words) - 02:18, 24 February 2011
  • Rules 3.3 Derivatives of Trigonometric Functions 3.4 Chain Rule 3.5 Higher Order Derivatives: an introduction to second order derivatives 3.6 Implicit
    2 KB (100 words) - 17:01, 30 April 2015
  • , where The following deal with the variable, , and a function, , of , and are examples of the chain rule in action.
    117 bytes (20 words) - 17:32, 30 July 2010
  • 3-dimensional Cartesian space coordinates. A comma derivative is just a convenient notation for a partial derivative with respect to one of the coordinates. Here
    822 bytes (130 words) - 02:59, 25 August 2009
  • language created by Walter Bright and available at Digital Mars. It's a C++ derivative with emphasis on execution efficiency, simple semantic models and safe
    24 KB (2,459 words) - 10:08, 22 February 2014
  • systems. We use the definition of the derivative, i.e., , to work these first two out. Let us find the derivative of sin x, using the above definition
    1 KB (175 words) - 20:17, 15 March 2012
  • license, the GNU Free Documentation License (GFDL) requires that any derivative of works from Wikibooks must be released under that same license, must
    2 KB (305 words) - 17:49, 7 June 2010
  • cases) derivative of a function. The second derivative is exactly what it sounds like, it is the derivative of a derivative. The third derivative is the
    9 KB (1,244 words) - 07:39, 29 May 2013
  • explicit form, that is, in the form . To find the derivative of y with respect to x, you take the derivative with respect to x of both sides of the equation
    8 KB (810 words) - 01:05, 9 October 2014
  • creates a derivative work to license that derivative work under a proprietary or closed source license. This ability to control a derivative work through
    8 KB (1,318 words) - 22:31, 2 September 2011
  • the derivative of a product is the product of the derivatives, similar to the sum and difference rules, but this is not true. To take the derivative of
    11 KB (946 words) - 02:01, 31 January 2016

View (previous 20  | next 20) (20 | 50 | 100 | 250 | 500)