Changes related to "Latin/Lesson 6-Pronouns"

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Show new changes starting from 04:05, 29 July 2016
   
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28 July 2016

27 July 2016

26 July 2016

  • (diff | hist) . . Latin/Lesson 1-Nominative‎; 22:46 . . (+184). .Sluffs (discuss | contribs)(The Nominative Case: added some translation examples for using the Latin conjunction "et" (and))
  • (diff | hist) . . Latin/Lesson 1-Nominative‎; 22:33 . . (-53). .Sluffs (discuss | contribs)(Notes on Vocabulary: changed "non" to "et" - Reasonː there were no examples using negation - may as well introduce the Latin for "and" - e.g. Roma est fama et magna (Rome is famous and great))
  • (diff | hist) . . m Latin/Lesson 1-Nominative‎; 22:27 . . (-11). .Sluffs (discuss | contribs)(removed duplicate Contents box)
  • (diff | hist) . . Latin/Lesson 1-Nominative‎; 21:53 . . (-257). .Sluffs (discuss | contribs)(removed ".....The "to be" verb simply serves as a linking verb, as "the good boy" is an incomplete sentence, but "the boy is good" is a complete sentence." - Reasonː explanation of subject, predicate and copula given in opening)
  • (diff | hist) . . m Latin‎; 21:48 . . (+1). .Sluffs (discuss | contribs)(External links)
  • (diff | hist) . . Latin‎; 21:44 . . (+180). .Sluffs (discuss | contribs)(External links: adding a link to the Public Domain bookː A Latin Grammar for Schools and Colleges by Albert Harkness - explains archaic forms, irregularities, inflections, etc)
  • (diff | hist) . . Latin/Lesson 1-Nominative‎; 21:25 . . (-277). .Sluffs (discuss | contribs)(removed "...when pluralized, "curr'''i'''t" becomes "curr'''u'''nt". The original spelling was...but changed to "currunt" over time to make it easier to say..." - Reasonː added link to free PD Latin Grammar book that lists Archaic and Irregular forms)
  • (diff | hist) . . Latin/Lesson 1-Nominative‎; 00:16 . . (+103). .Sluffs (discuss | contribs)(The Nominative Case: to translateː Italia est in Europa, Germania est in Europa, Britannia est in Europa - using two words not in the Vocabulary - the modern word in English is so close to the Latin so as to be easily deduced)

25 July 2016

24 July 2016

  • (diff | hist) . . m Latin‎; 23:16 . . (+2). .Sluffs (discuss | contribs)
  • (diff | hist) . . Latin‎; 23:14 . . (+12). .Sluffs (discuss | contribs)(External links: removingː A complete textbook for spoken Classical Latin, G.J. Adler's - Reasonː replacing with Whitaker's Words - a Latin dictionary DOS program (must run in a console but just type in a word instant definition - quickest method))
  • (diff | hist) . . Latin/Lesson 1-Nominative‎; 22:50 . . (+82). .Sluffs (discuss | contribs)(The Nominative Case: adding material - Roma est fama - Roma est magna - Roma est in Italia)
  • (diff | hist) . . m Latin/Lesson 1-Nominative‎; 22:37 . . (-30). .Sluffs (discuss | contribs)(The Nominative Case)
  • (diff | hist) . . Latin/Lesson 1-Nominative‎; 21:23 . . (+2). .Sluffs (discuss | contribs)(Notes on Vocabulary: changing "templum" to "Germania" - same reason as before - including two countries - European countries and regions are very easy to learn in Latin - e.g. Italia, Britannia)
  • (diff | hist) . . Latin/Lesson 1-Nominative‎; 21:16 . . (+87). .Sluffs (discuss | contribs)(Notes on Vocabulary: changing "triclīnium" to "Roma" - removing neuter nouns from Vocabulary section - first lesson restricted to mainly feminine nouns with the odd 2nd declension masculine - Roma est fama (Rome is famous))
  • (diff | hist) . . Latin/Lesson 1-Nominative‎; 19:55 . . (-31). .Sluffs (discuss | contribs)(Notes on Vocabulary: reduced adjectives in the Vocabulary section to just feminine gender - Oxford Latin Course (Part 1) by Balme and Moorwood does introduce 2nd declension masc. nouns but adjectives are restricted to 1st declension fem. nouns)
  • (diff | hist) . . Latin/Lesson 1-Nominative‎; 19:46 . . (-12). .Sluffs (discuss | contribs)(removing bold (not needed) - also will be altering the vocabulary section to follow the modern The Oxford Latin Course (Part 1) - no point in introducing all the inflections in one go - information overload)
  • (diff | hist) . . Latin/Lesson 1-Nominative‎; 19:17 . . (-174). .Sluffs (discuss | contribs)(The Nominative Case: rewriting exercise - Latin is easy to learn - fifty percent of the words in English are derived directly or indirectly from those bloody Romans - so rewriting exercise to get barbarians translating immediately)