100% developed

Sega Dreamcast

From Wikibooks, open books for an open world
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Dreamcast Console with Controller and VMU.

History[edit]

Development[edit]

Developers were intrigued by the capabilities of the Dreamcast, with a less limiting environment enabling them to pursue more ideas easily.[1]

Launch[edit]

The Dreamcast was launched in Japan in November of 1998.[2]

The Dreamcast was launched in the United States on September 9th, 1999 (9/9/99) for a cost of $199, and had over 300,000 preorders.[3] In the United States a million Dreamcast consoles were sold within the first month of launching.[4]

Legacy[edit]

In early 2001 Sega announced they would discontinue Dreamcast production in favor of pursuing software on other platforms.[5]Sega Chairman and President Isao Okawa donated 85 billion yen (Then worth $692 million US Dollars) of personal funds to ensure Sega continued to operate while the company began to focus on software.[6][7] 9.13 million Dreamcast consoles were sold around the globe.[8][9]

Following it's discontinuation, the Dreamcast and it's game library had a cult following.[10][11]

Sega was in poor financial shape immediately before the launch of the Dreamcast, and remained so for a short while after the Dreamcast was discontinued.

Technology[edit]

Dreamcast was one of the nicest early consoles to develop for.
—John Carmack, Tweet on December 11th, 2018.[12]

Compute[edit]

A Hitachi SH-4 CPU clocked at 400 megahertz powers the dreamcast.[13] The CPU is capable of about 1.4 GigaFLOPS.[14][15]

The Dreamcast uses a custom GPU called Holly, featuring a NEC PowerVR2 DC core clocked at 100 megahertz.[13][16] The GPU is capable of about 7 million polygons with textures and lighting a second.[14]

The Dreamcast shipped with 16MB of RAM.[17][13] The Dreamcast also has 8 megabytes of VRAM and 2 megabytes of Sound RAM.[13]

A Yamaha AICA Chip including a 32-bit ARM7DI CPU clocked at 45 megahertz and capable of 40 MIPS is dedicated for sound processing including surround sound support.[13][16]

Storage[edit]

The Dreamcast uses one gigabyte GD-Rom disks.[13]

Connectivity[edit]

The Dreamcast supported Dial-Up internet, with a 33.6k modem at launch and a 56k modem after September 1999.[13]

Software[edit]

Most Dreamcast games used custom software from Sega.[13] The Windows CE SDK was optionally available for developers to use on the Dreamcast, allowing the use of Visual C++ and DirectX in game development for the Dreamcast.[18] Only about 50 Dreamcast games leveraged this SDK.[19]

Bleamcast was an early commercial emulator released for the Dreamcast, allowing the system to emulate certain PS1 games.

Notable Games[edit]

Demo kiosk

1998[edit]

1999[edit]

2000[edit]

2001[edit]

Atelier Marie: The Alchemist of Salburg[edit]

A bundled disk with bonus features like screensavers also accidentally included a virus for Windows computers, but left the Dreamcast unharmed.[20]

Read more about Atelier Marie: The Alchemist of Salburg on Wikipedia.

2002[edit]

Gallery[edit]

Console Hardware[edit]

Console Accessories[edit]

Special Edition Consoles[edit]

Fuji Divers 2000 Series CX-1[edit]

The Divers 2000 Series CX-1 integrated a Dreamcast into a television.

Technology[edit]

Development[edit]

External Resources[edit]

References[edit]

  1. McAloon, Alissa. "Dreamcast devs reflect on how the industry has changed since the console's debut". https://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/350563/Dreamcast_devs_reflect_on_how_the_industry_has_changed_since_the_consoles_debut.php. Retrieved 14 November 2020. 
  2. "HISTORY SEGA 60th Anniversary" (in en). https://60th.sega.com/en/history/. Retrieved 18 November 2020. 
  3. "The BG News September 9, 1999". 9 September 1999. https://scholarworks.bgsu.edu/bg-news/6519/. Retrieved 1 November 2020. 
  4. Sheffield, Brandon. "Dreamcast 20th anniversary interview extravaganza". https://www.gamasutra.com/blogs/BrandonSheffield/20190909/350345/Dreamcast_20th_anniversary_interview_extravaganza.php. Retrieved 14 November 2020. 
  5. Watts, Jonathan (1 February 2001). "Sega to end production of Dreamcast console". https://www.theguardian.com/business/2001/feb/01/4. Retrieved 14 November 2020. 
  6. Tanikawa, Miki (17 March 2001). "Isao Okawa, 74, Chief of Sega And Pioneer Investor in Japan (Published 2001)". https://www.nytimes.com/2001/03/17/business/isao-okawa-74-chief-of-sega-and-pioneer-investor-in-japan.html. Retrieved 15 November 2020. 
  7. McFerran, Damien (22 February 2012). "The Rise and Fall of Sega Enterprises" (in en). https://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2012-02-22-the-rise-and-fall-of-sega-enterprises. Retrieved 15 November 2020. 
  8. "Sega Dreamcast (1998-2001 )" (in en). 18 October 2016. https://hiscoga.wordpress.com/sega-dreamcast-1998-2001/. Retrieved 14 November 2020. 
  9. "Sega Dreamcast is 20 years old today in the West". 9 September 2019. https://www.videogameschronicle.com/news/sega-dreamcast-is-20/. Retrieved 14 November 2020. 
  10. "I’ll Never Love a Console Like I Loved the SEGA Dreamcast" (in en). https://www.vice.com/en/article/zngabj/ill-never-love-a-console-like-i-loved-the-sega-dreamcast-653. Retrieved 14 November 2020. 
  11. staff, Eurogamer (1 February 2009). "Dreamcast Cult Classics" (in en). https://www.eurogamer.net/articles/dreamcast-cult-classics-article. Retrieved 14 November 2020. 
  12. "https://twitter.com/id_aa_carmack/status/1072478057448030212" (in en). https://twitter.com/id_aa_carmack/status/1072478057448030212. Retrieved 1 November 2020. 
  13. a b c d e f g h "Looking back at the Windows CE supporting Sega Dreamcast". 13 July 2017. https://www.windowscentral.com/sega-dreamcast. Retrieved 4 November 2020. 
  14. a b White, Matthew (26 July 2014). "Sega Dreamcast Hardware Analysis" (in en). https://thesolidstategamer.wordpress.com/2014/07/26/sega-dreamcast-hardware-analysis/. Retrieved 4 November 2020. 
  15. "THE WAR FOR America's thumbs -- (Rebuttal)". http://www.gamezero.com/team-0/articles/features/thumbs_up/. Retrieved 21 November 2020. 
  16. a b "Dreamcast Architecture A Practical Analysis" (in en). 7 October 2019. https://www.copetti.org/projects/consoles/dreamcast/. Retrieved 4 November 2020. 
  17. "Double The RAM Of A Dreamcast Console For A Cool 32 MB". Hackaday. 26 June 2020. https://hackaday.com/2020/06/26/double-the-ram-of-a-dreamcast-console-for-a-cool-32-mb/. Retrieved 28 October 2020. 
  18. "Microsoft Announces Windows CE Toolkit for Dreamcast". 16 March 1999. https://news.microsoft.com/1999/03/16/microsoft-announces-windows-ce-toolkit-for-dreamcast/. Retrieved 4 November 2020. 
  19. "Windows CE is Best OS and Dreamcast is Best PC?". https://www.thedreamcastjunkyard.co.uk/2016/05/windows-ce-is-best-os-and-dreamcast-is.html. Retrieved 4 November 2020. 
  20. Charnock, Tom. "Atelier: The Dreamcast Game That Could Destroy Your PC On Christmas Day". https://www.thedreamcastjunkyard.co.uk/2017/07/atelier-dreamcast-game-that-could.html. Retrieved 4 November 2020.