100% developed

ApeXtreme

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History[edit]

The ApeXtreme was set to launch in spring, and then the summer of 2004 at a cost of around $399 for the full unit, and $299 for a reduced capability console.[1][2] The announcement of revised specifications around March of 2004 also included raising the price to $499.[3]

In December of 2004 the chairman of Apex Digital was arrested by authorities in China on charges of fraud.[4] At the time Apex had 113 employees.[4]

By January 3rd, 2005 development on the ApeXtreme was postponed, with DISCover support being dropped from the planned console.[5]

Technology[edit]

CES 2004 Specs[edit]

Compute[edit]

The ApeXtreme uses a VIA CN400 processor clocked at 1.4 gigahertz[6]

The GPU of the ApeXtreme is a S3 DeltaChrome.[6]

Hardware[edit]

The ApeXtreme had planned to use a 40 gigabyte IDE hard drive and a DVD player for storage.[6][2][7]

Via Vinyl Audio was going to be used to offer Dolby 5.1 sound output.[6]

The ApeXtreme offered 10/100 megabit ethernet, and also a dial up modem with a speed of 56.6 kilobits per second for internet connectivity.[8][6]

Software[edit]

The ApeXtreme runs an embedded version of Windows XP.[2][7]

Mid 2004 specs[edit]

Compute[edit]

The ApeXtreme was supposed to use an AMD Athlon XP 2000+ processor.[3][9]

The ApeXtreme was set to use a GeForce 4MX GPU built into a motherboard using the nForce2 chipset by Biostar.[3][9]

RAM used was 256 megabytes of DDR SDRAM clocked at 256 Megahertz.[3][10]

Hardware[edit]

The revised system still included a 40 gigabyte hard drive.[3][9]

The ApeXtreme was supposed to be capable of recording video.[3][9]

Notable games[edit]

The ApeXtreme was intended to play existing PC games.[2]

External Resources[edit]

References[edit]

  1. "Nine Toys the Techies Are Drooling For". 21 March 2004. https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/2004/03/21/nine-toys-the-techies-are-drooling-for/2c24e789-548b-430d-9261-18e8b93ffbc0/. Retrieved 12 November 2020. 
  2. a b c d "CES04 Live: Driving to Convergence" (in en). 11 January 2004. https://www.soundandvision.com/content/ces04-live-driving-convergence. Retrieved 12 November 2020. 
  3. a b c d e f "Widescreen Review Webzine News Apex Digital Announces Final Specifications And Partners For Its Revolutionary ApeXtreme DVD Player And PC Game Console". https://www.widescreenreview.com/news_detail.php?id=8458. Retrieved 12 November 2020. 
  4. a b "US company boss arrested in China". 30 December 2004. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/4134349.stm. Retrieved 12 November 2020. 
  5. Maragos, Nich. "Gamasutra - The Art & Business of Making Games" (in en). https://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/95715/ApeXtreme_Hardware_Release_On_Hold.php. Retrieved 12 November 2020. 
  6. a b c d e "Spot On: The ApeXtreme PC Game Console". https://www.gamespot.com/articles/spot-on-the-apextreme-pc-game-console/1100-6086185/. Retrieved 12 November 2020. 
  7. a b "VIA/Apex Game Console Details Leaked - Slashdot" (in en). https://games.slashdot.org/story/04/01/06/0424257/viaapex-game-console-details-leaked. Retrieved 12 November 2020. 
  8. "mini-itx.com - news - ApeXtreme Gaming Console shown at CES". https://www.mini-itx.com/2004/01/12/apextreme-gaming-console-shown-at-ces. Retrieved 12 November 2020. 
  9. a b c d "ApeXtreme specs revamped". 26 March 2004. https://techreport.com/news/6486/apextreme-specs-revamped/. Retrieved 12 November 2020. 
  10. "E3 2004: DISCover Discovered - IGN" (in en). https://www.ign.com/articles/2004/05/12/e3-2004-discover-discovered. Retrieved 12 November 2020.