Esper/Numbers

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Names of Numbers[edit]

In the Esper' language number naming is partially derived from Esperanto number naming, partially derived from Pont' number naming, and partially derived from the International System of Units, corresponding to prefixes used in the “Metric System”, but you don't need to worry about the origins of the naming system or individual umber names in order to master numbers in the Esper' language. If you are familiar with terms like "kilogram" and "decade" then the corresponding Esper' number names should come easily to you. Here is a simple list of the most basic raw number names, without any inflections added to specify in what sense they are meant:

nul’ = (zero).

on’ = (one).

du’ = (two).

tri’ = (three).

kvar’ = (four).

kvin’ = (five).

ses’ = (six).

sep’ = (seven).

ok’ = (eight).

naw’ = (nine).

dek’ = (ten) = (10^1).

hek’ = (hundred) = (10^2).

kil’ = (thousand) = (10^3).

meg’ = (million) = (10^6).

For number names beyond the millions, see the Big Numbers page.

These are word roots, but the names representing the humbers zero through ten also function as prefixes. The special single digit number names for numbers from eleven through sixteen which are useful in other base systems also double as prefixes, but you won't need them for ordinary, that is "base ten" number named, nor will you need to use the Esper' name for ten as a prefix for ordinary number names.

Arguably perhaps the simplest way of forming names of other numbers from these is using the method derived from Esperanto, which allows the names representing any number zero through nine to be prefixed as multipliers onto name of the number for ten, or placed in front of other large number names as a separate word to indicate multiplication by that amount while allowing smaller number names to be placed after larger number names to indicate addition. Okay so even this is a simplified explanation sounds a little complicated, but you are already familiar with the basic concepts of the system if you can count in English, except that the English names for numbers such as "thirty" and "forty" are formed irregularly and the "ty" is suffixed as a representation of "ten" rather than prefixing the smaller unit name to the name for ten without changing either, as done in Esperanto and inherited by the Esper' language. Also note that the "teens" which in English suffix a different representation of ten to denote addition rather than multiplication, have their equivalent nonsensical naming system in many other languages as well, but not in Esper', nor in Esperanto. Instead, you just place the single digit name at the end like you would for the "three" in numbers like "twenty three" and "forty three" in English.

Here is a sampling to give you a clearer picture of the basic idea. Note that I am using the "short scale" for English number names in these examples. If you are not familiar with the English short scale number naming, use the scientific notation after each example to work it out. Because the naming system is completely regular and you likely already know how to count in a semi-regular system, you should be able to pick up the pattern without too many examples being needed:

dek on’ = (eleven) = (1.1 * 10^1).

dek' du’ = (twelve) = (1.2 * 10^1).

dek' tri’ = (thirteen) = (1.3 * 10^1).

dek' kvar’ = (fourteen) = (1.4 * 10^1).

dek' kvin’ = (fifteen) = (1.5 * 10^1).

dek' ses’ = (sixteen) = (1.6 * 10^1).

dek' sep’ = (seventeen) = (1.7 * 10^1).

dek' ok’ = (eighteen) = (1.8 * 10^1).

dek' naw’ = (ninteen) = (1.9 * 10^1).

dudek’ = (twenty) = (2 * 10^1).

dudek on’ = (twenty one) = (2.1 * 10^1).

dudek' du’ = (twenty two) = (2.2 * 10^1).

dudek' tri’ = (twenty three) = (2.3 * 10^1).

tridek’ = (thirty) = (3 * 10^1).

tridek' kvar’ = (thirty four) = (3.4 * 10^1).

tridek' kvin’ = (thirty five) = (3.5 * 10^1).

kvardek’ = (forty) = (4 * 10^1).

kvar dek' ses’ = (forty six) = (4.6 * 10^1).

kvindek’ = (fifty) = (5 * 10^1).

kvin’ dek' ses' = (fifty six) = (5.6 * 10^1).

sesdek’ = (sixty) = (6 * 10^1).

sepdek' sep’ = (seventy seven) = (7.7 * 10^1).

nawdek' ok’ = (ninty eight) = (9.8 * 10^1).

nawdek' naw’ = (ninty nine) = (9.9 * 10^1).

hek’ = (hundred) = (10^2).

du' hek’ = (two hundred) = (2 * 10^2).

tri’ hek' kvar' = (three hundred four) = (3.04 * 10^2).

ses' hek’ = (six hundred) = (6 * 10^2).

naw' hek’ = (nine hundred) = (9 * 10^2).

naw' hek’ sep' = (nine hundred seven) = (9.07 * 10^2).

tri' kil’ = (three thousand) = (3 * 10^3).

du' kil’ on' hek' kvindek' = (two thousand one hundred fifty) = (2.15 * 10^3).

hek’ kil' = (hundred thousand) = (10^4).

kvar' meg’ = (four million) = (4 * 10^6).

dek’ meg' = (ten million) = (10^7).

Go to the Scientific_Number_Naming page for details on a system of number names based on normalized scientific notation.