Carnatic Music

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Carnatic music is a type of classical Indian music, usually sung.

Exercises[edit | edit source]

Sarali varisai (IPA: saraɭi ʋaɾisaɪ) is the first set of exercises. The first one is an ascent and descent of the middle octave. The second one focuses on Ri (second note from Sa in accent) and Ni (second note from Sa in descent). The third focuses on Ga and Dha. The fourth focuses on Ma and Pa. This goes on up to the seventh varisai.

Janta varisai (IPA: dʑaɳʈaɪ ʋaɾisaɪ), also called jantai varisai[1] focuses on notes being sung twice in a row. The first one is an ascent and descent of the middle octave.

Melsthayi varisai (IPA: me:lsta:ji ʋaɾisaɪ) focuses on the higher octave. The first one focuses on high Sa. The second focuses on high Ri, and so on. Each new one adds new phrases to the previous. They progressively cover up to Pa in the higher octave. The second one and on contain some janta.

Mandhra sthayi varisai (IPA: man̪ðiɾasta:ji ʋaɾisaɪ) focuses on the lower octave. The first one focuses on Sa. The second focuses on low Ni, and so on. Each new one adds new phrases to the previous. They progressively cover up to Ma in the lower octave. The second one and on contain some janta.

Dhatu varisai (IPA: ða:ʈɯ ʋaɾisaɪ) focuses on jumping from note to note. They increase the student's overall of notes.

Alankarams (IPA: alaŋka:ɾam) focus on the 35 thalams. 7 are usually taught to the students.

References[edit | edit source]