Wikijunior:The Elements/Argon

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Shows the position of Argon on the periodic chart.
Argon's symbol on the Periodic Table

What does it look, feel, taste, or smell like?[edit]

Argon has no smell. It is a colorless gas. It has no taste. It, being inert, is non-toxic.

How was it discovered?[edit]

Argon was discovered by Lord Rayleigh and Sir William Ramsay in 1894. It was isolated by examination of the residue obtained by removing nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water from clean air. In fact, air contains slightly less than 1% argon, making it the third most abundant gas in air, behind nitrogen and oxygen. The atmosphere of Mars contains less than 2% argon. It was recognized by the characteristic lines in the red end of the spectrum.

Where did its name come from?[edit]

The name Argon comes from argos, the Greek word for lazy or inactive. It got this name, because it doesn't react easily with other elements.

Did You Know?

  • Argon is heavier than air.
  • Argon is the third most abundant gas in air.
  • Argon forms only one compound.

Where is it found?[edit]

Argon is found in the air and is a byproduct of the production of oxygen and nitrogen. Argon makes up .93% of the Earth's atmosphere.

What are its uses?[edit]

Canisters containing Argon gas for use in putting out fire without damaging server equipment
Argon can be used to make light signs

Argon can be used to put out fires without damaging electronics. Argon is used in welding arcs and growing semiconductor crystals. Argon is also used in some light signs. Light signs containing argon emit a deep blue light.

Is it dangerous?[edit]

Argon is usually not dangerous; it can be inhaled safely as long as there is also oxygen.

References[edit]