Wikibooks:Featured books/Nominations

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Featured Book Nomination Archives
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  • Nominations for addition should be moved to subpages at Wikibooks:Featured books/Nominations/Addition/FullBookName
  • Nominations for removal should be moved to subpages at Wikibooks:Featured books/Nominations/Removal/FullBookName
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The goal of this page is to feature those books which are considered among the best of what Wikibooks has to offer, in an effort to raise standards in content development. Criteria for judging books, and rules about discussions, can be found at Wikibooks:Good books. When nominating a book for removal of featured book status, consider adding {{featured book removal}} to the book and notifying the primary or active contributors, as they may be able to address your concerns about the content.

Nominations for Removal[edit]

Basic Computing Using Windows[edit]

This book was featured 7 years ago and doesn't meet the criteria any longer. The content is completely outdated and the pages are almost empty. This book hasn't been updated as there is almost no contributions.

Also, Wikibooks had featured too many computing-related books and there are other computing-related books that are much better and not featured. We need a clean of this category. Ftiercel (discusscontribs) 19:19, 21 June 2014‎ (UTC)

  • Symbol support vote.svg Support - Despite my moan about so many computing books I am reluctant to suggest removing featured book status from books in general. However this book is outdated and pages are rather short. Much of the information is outdated especially for Win7/8.--ЗAНИA Flag of the Isle of Mann.svgtalk 11:47, 22 June 2014 (UTC)
  • Symbol support vote.svg Support It isn't too bad, but it is clearly insufficient. In all cases, it certainly isn’t “[a]ccurate, comprehensive, and concise enough to effectively teach and learn from in its current state”, and that’s the most important criterion in my opinion. --Mark Otaris (discusscontribs) 21:29, 22 June 2014 (UTC)
  • Symbol support vote.svg Support - Definitely. Unless we can get it updated/filled out so that it does match the current criteria (quite a large task, although if other people are willing to do the same I can probably help out), it should have its featured status revoked. --SporkSauce (discusscontribs) 09:37, 16 December 2014 (UTC)
  • Symbol neutral vote.svg Neutral- I've done quite a bit of reorganization on the book by adding headers and updating information to make it comparable with newer versions of Windows , but there's still quite a bit of work left on some chapters. I can help on the remaining chapters as well. The fact that if this is done fully , then the book can hold on to its Featured Book status.
    If you want , you can temporarily remove the status from the book while the reorganisation is going on , but then it'll take more time to get it back once it is complete.

Nominations for Addition[edit]

Data Mining Algorithms In R[edit]

Really nice and crisp book. It has the following chapters

Dimensionality Reduction- Principal Component Analysis,Singular Value Decomposition,Feature Selection

Frequent Pattern Mining- The Eclat Algorithm,arulesNBMiner,The Apriori Algorithm,The FP-Growth Algorithm

Sequence Mining- SPADE,DEGSeq

Clustering- K-Means, Hybrid Hierarchical Clustering, Expectation Maximization (EM),Dissimilarity Matrix Calculation,Hierarchical Clustering,Bayesian Hierarchical Clustering,Density-Based Clustering, K-Cores, Fuzzy Clustering - Fuzzy C-means,RockCluster,Biclust, Partitioning Around Medoids (PAM),CLUES,Self-Organizing Maps (SOM), Proximus,CLARA

Classification- SVM,penalizedSVM,kNN, Outliers,Decision Trees,Naïve Bayes,adaboost,JRip

R Packages- RWeka,gausspred,optimsimplex,CCMtools,FactoMineR,nnet

Sensory Systems[edit]

While this book was started by myself, it now contains chapters written by 18 other authors. It gives a comprehensive overview over sensory systems. Thereby not only the physiological aspects are covered, but also ways of simulating these systems with computers, and - for humans - ways of technically substituting for deficient sensory end organs (e.g. cochlear implants). Recently it has been expanded to include more information about sensory systmes in non-primates (spiders, fish, insects, ...). --Thomas.haslwanter (discusscontribs) 16:13, 20 July 2014 (UTC)

Non-Programmer's Tutorial for Python 3[edit]

I'm nominating this because this book is ridiculously hard to find compared to the other Python books yet is probably the best. I am not the creator, I however used this to learn python. It taught me more than my teachers did in the first six months of class. --Liberivore (discusscontribs) 15:42, 11 July 2014 (UTC)

Symbol support vote.svg Support I agree. The book is also small, but still have what you need to get started.

RAC Attack - Oracle Cluster Database at Home[edit]

This is a hands-on lab curriculum for learning about Oracle RAC cluster databases. I am the primary author. Just finished the print/pdf versions this week; finally feel that it's ready to suggest for featuring.

The book differs from most other wikibooks in that it heavily draws on "fair use" images. We discussed this a few years ago when I was first considering if wikibooks would be a good platform for the book. Unfortunately, it's not really possible to do a tutorial on this subject without drawing on fair use images. Not sure how this would impact the decision about whether it should be featured. ArdentPerf (discusscontribs) 20:43, 5 April 2013 (UTC)

Coaching Youth Middle Distance Runners[edit]

For this work, I set out to create a review of available and current literature on the subject, hence the large number of references (~200). If people wanted to read more, I wanted to make sure it was available vis-à-vis references and further information. Although presented in a somewhat different style than is typical on this site, it should be familiar to many in the field, and is consistently applied throughout each chapter.

I'm sure that there are some tweaks can be made here and there, and there's always the possibility of major expansion, but I believe this fits within the context of WB:WIW and it meets the guidelines listed in Wikibooks:Good books, hence the reason I'm nominating this for FB status. Your thoughts and constructive criticism are greatly appreciated. – Runfellow (discusscontribs) 15:46, 16 September 2013 (UTC)

Symbol support vote.svg Support I don't know why I'm the first to voice my opinion here but anyway, I like it. I think there could be more images but otherwise everything seems in order.--ЗAНИA Flag of Estonia.svgtalk 19:34, 12 May 2014 (UTC)

Wikijunior:Europe[edit]

I'm nominating this book despite creating it myself over many years with support here and there from others. The book is more-or-less finished but it will always be developed further. Right now I'm working on a quiz which is being developed in my user page sandbox. Country statistics always need to be updated fairly often. This book has also been translated and developed into German and Romanian on their Wikijunior sites. The target of this book is teenagers / high school children rather than the typical pre-teens of most Wikijunior books.--ЗAНИA Flag of Estonia.svgtalk 19:39, 12 May 2014 (UTC)

Symbol support vote.svg Support I'm in support for this. It has lots of quality content , and it's not hard to understand either.--Leaderboard 17:40, 13 December 2014 (UTC)

More C++ Idioms[edit]

Note: Self nomination. The objective of this book is to help elevate the knowledge of programmers who have moderate level of familiarity with C++ to a level where they feel much friendlier with C++. It provides an exhaustive catalog of modern reusable C++ idioms based on what expert programmers often use while programming/designing using C++. It is an effort to capture their vocabulary and concepts into a single work. Also see Nominations/Addition/More C++ Idioms.

Some facts about the book:

  1. It has been translated in Japanese More C++ Idioms
  2. It has been cited independently as a "good read" or "reference" 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, and more...

--Sutambe (discuss. • contribs) 20:25, 18 June 2014 (UTC)

  • Symbol neutral vote.svg Neutral Yes the book is comprehensive, but looking at some pages to get a feel for the book, I notice examples without explanations to there strengths, weaknesses, and any relevant caveats, such as defining a macro named "break" will break the expected behavior of the "break" keyword. I notice some pages are missing references. I notice some idioms have drawbacks that can be addressed by using newer features of C++, such as deleting copy and assignment constructors rather then making copy and assignment constructors private. Some idioms should recommend using the standard library first, such as std::is_member_pointer, or explain why the standard library isn't being used. --darklama 14:41, 19 June 2014 (UTC)
I agree that explanations of some idioms can be expanded. Some idioms have received more comprehensive treatment than others. Regarding drawbacks of idioms: It is not the goal of this book to use the newest language features. In fact, some language idioms that are described comprehensively in the book will simply vanish in C++11 and C++14. Instead, I like the idea of recommending a language feature or a standard library if it exists in a certain environment (C++11/14). Can you please mention which idioms can use std::is_member_pointer? ----Sutambe (discusscontribs) 17:18, 19 June 2014 (UTC)
I was thinking the same, that language features or the standard library should be recommended when available in a certain environment, and keep idioms for people that may be using an older environment, or anyone interested in understanding how the standard library might implement an idiom. My thinking is people trying to learn from this book are not being taught enough to make well informed decisions about what idioms to use or not use, and would miss out unless they look beyond this book.
I noticed the Member Detector idiom as one idiom where std::is_member_pointer and friends may be more appropriate than rolling your own, unless you want to understand how the standard library does it or are using an older environment. --darklama 19:03, 19 June 2014 (UTC)
  • Symbol neutral vote.svg Neutral This isn't criticism of this book but I just feel there are too many Computing Featured books. Wikibooks needs to show people visiting this site that there is more than just IT books here. We should have a maximum and minimum number of books chosen as Featured books for each subject.--ЗAНИA Flag of the Isle of Mann.svgtalk 21:00, 19 June 2014 (UTC)

Lua Programming[edit]

I am nominating this book, which I have started working on in January 2013, because it is now complete and I think it is a book of sufficient quality to be featured on Wikibooks’ main page and be considered as a quality book. To comment each of the criteria mentioned in Wikibooks:Good books#Criteria:

  • I believe this book conforms to all the Wikibooks policies and guidelines in a reasonable way.
  • I think it has an appropriate and consistent definition (it is meant to teach the syntax and libraries of the latest version of the Lua programming language to a person with any level of programming experience, with a focus on embedded environments).
  • I am certain that “[a]ll current organizational systems are properly and appropriately used.”
  • I am absolutely convinced that it is “[a]ccurate, comprehensive, and concise enough to effectively teach and learn from in its current state.”
  • It has a table of contents and uses navigational aids to make navigation easier.
  • It is “[f]ree of major issues, like reorganization, orphaned or missing material, copyright violations, deletion, unmaintained, and unresolved disputes.”

There is some cleanup left to do, but this cleanup concerns pages of the old Lua Programming book that need to be history merged and manually merged into the main book. --Mark Otaris (discusscontribs) 04:20, 19 June 2014 (UTC)

I mentioned orphaned material exists in Category:Lua Programming on Lua Programming's discussion page, left over from the recent book merger, because there is some overlap between pages and was better to err on the side of caution.

As I was looking over pages I felt the book was poorly organized, for example the expressions chapter begins with "As explained before" and the chapter's emphases is on types and not on expressions as a person would expect. I also felt coverage was perhaps 50% for someone new to the language, for example when talking about Integers and Floating point numbers there is no mention of any reasonable limitations of supported value ranges or precision, which should be considered for portability, or how the exact range depends on configurations when the Lua interpretor was compiled, which should be understand when Lua is used embedded. I also notice a complete absence of coverage and examples for advance uses of the language, like using tables as classes to provide inheritance, polymorphism, data abstraction, etc. Examples for all the metatable methods seem to be missing as well. --darklama 12:20, 19 June 2014 (UTC)

I think the emphasis in the chapter about expressions is on types and operators, which are largely discussed in the types section (it is logical to discuss them there, since different operators apply to different types of values). And I think this is all fine, because expressions, as I have noted in that chapter, are made of values (with types) and operators.

It is true that the book lacks more technical details about Lua, but I specifically avoided them because a book meant to learn Lua isn’t the right place to teach that numbers are limited to a specific value. I think technical details of this kind belong in the Lua Reference Manual: they aren’t things people will have to know often, and when they’ll need to know them, people will naturally look there. Furthermore, these details are much less relevant in embedded environments. To be honest, in all the programming I’ve done in Lua, I have never needed to know what the limits or precision of numbers were.

I have intentionally avoided talking about objects, inheritance, polymorphism or anything else related to object-oriented programming or other paradigms. The Lua language is designed to allow the use of many paradigms without enforcing or encouraging the use of any of them specifically, and I have followed this design decision by only describing all the mechanisms Lua provides for various programming patterns, without describing how they can be used to enable these patterns (a discussion of object-oriented programming in Lua could easily take an entire chapter and not have much to do with Lua itself).

You are right that there are not examples for all the metamethods. I don’t think they are necessary, but adding one or two more examples could make them clearer. I don’t think it’s a major issue.

Finally, I think the book is largely comprehensive, if we exclude the technical details that someone wishing to embed Lua in an environment needs to know. This is indeed a huge gap that is missing. It is not necessary to have a comprehensive overview of the language itself, but it would interest many readers of the book, although it does not fit directly in the purpose, which is to describe usage of Lua in an embedded environment (and not how to create a such environment in the first place). I would be really glad if someone more experienced than I am with the C API and embedding Lua could fill this gap, but I do not believe I can do it myself. I’d like to thank you for your comments. --Mark Otaris (discusscontribs) 15:23, 20 June 2014 (UTC)

I’ve just re-thought about what I said about the paradigms Lua enables the use of, and I have changed my mind. If I get the time, I will write an appendix describing how object-oriented programming can be done in Lua. I also wish to write such an appendix about unit testing, and I think there are some other things that could interest readers but that would not fit in the main flow of the book. --Mark Otaris (discusscontribs) 15:56, 20 June 2014 (UTC)
I'm glad you have reconsidered. Put another way, I think people should be able to learn how to write reusable and portable Lua programs. My intent was not to suggest one paradigm over another. People just often use the OOP paradigm when writing reusable and portable Lua programs, because that paradigm is well suited for tables and metatables. Part of writing Lua programs that will work across different computer systems is knowing what assumptions are safe and unsafe to make. The Number type is represented as a double-precision floating-point number, so assuming that "myInteger = 2^64" means myInteger is an integer with no fractions or exponents is an unsafe assumption to make. I think citing the Lua Reference Manual is great, but people should also be able to learn to write safe and reusable code from reading this book without needing to buy another book to learn it, or have access to a working Internet connection after they are done reading this book. I think a featured computer programming book should make a reasonable attempt to teach everything within the scope of the core language. I would question featuring an English book that decided to leave "Z" or compound sounds to some other book for similar reasons. --darklama 21:02, 20 June 2014 (UTC)
  • Symbol neutral vote.svg Neutral This isn't criticism of this book but I just feel there are too many Computing Featured books. Wikibooks needs to show people visiting this site that there is more than just IT books here. We should have a maximum and minimum number of books chosen as Featured books for each subject.--ЗAНИA Flag of the Isle of Mann.svgtalk 21:01, 19 June 2014 (UTC)
I have noticed this pattern as well, and I agree: Wikibooks seems to me to have more books about computing than anything else. However, I’d like to suggest another solution than limiting the number of featured books about any given subject: we could, instead, make the distinction between featured books about different subjects clearer and change the rotation system on the main page to show an equal number of books about all the eleven major subjects mentioned in the Card Catalog Office. This would have the added advantage of allowing us to show three featured books, all with different subjects, at the same time on the main page, instead of arbitrarily showing a random featured book, a random Wikijunior book and a random recipe (the cookbook would need its own subject, of course, and Wikijunior is already a category in the CCO. This is hard to automate, but that’s another issue, and this isn’t the right place to discuss any of this anyway. --Mark Otaris (discusscontribs) 15:23, 20 June 2014 (UTC)
I have another solution: Nominate the worst featured computing book for removal. I invite anybody to search the worst ones and nominate it to clean the category. I have already nominated the Basic Computing Using Windows book. I think this one is the least advanced one. Ftiercel (discusscontribs) 19:19, 21 June 2014 (UTC)

Japanese[edit]

I think this book is a great introduction to a complex topic such as a language. It is also useful as a quick reference, like when I was learning to write kana for calligraphy. It supports numerous learning styles and has some very useful resources. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Felixphew (discusscontribs) 02:17, 25 June 2014

Symbol oppose vote.svg OpposeI like it. Seems like a really useful book. I would vote in favour but a few things seem amiss. The Beginners' lessons like to a user space User:Retropunk/Japanese Curriculum/Outline/Beginner Lessons. I also feel that when dealing with a pitch language like Japanese that audio files are essential.--ЗAНИA Flag of the Isle of Mann.svgtalk 00:41, 24 November 2014 (UTC)
I note that Japanese is not a "pitch" language. Chinese is tonal, though... Chazz (talk) 02:34, 24 November 2014 (UTC)
OK, not a pitch language but pitch is a significant feature especially of some accents. For example, the only pronunciation difference between the word for now and that of living room is in the pitch.--ЗAНИA Flag of the Isle of Mann.svgtalk 11:11, 24 November 2014 (UTC)

Basic Physics of Digital Radiography[edit]

I'd like to nominate this wikibook as a Featured Book. It is a companion text to the Basic Physics of Nuclear Medicine - which has been a featured book for many year now. Styles, level of development and educational standard are almost identical. marz (discusscontribs) 05:37, 3 December 2014 (UTC)