User:Stephen2nd

From Wikibooks, open books for an open world
Jump to: navigation, search

Stephen2nd[edit]

Hi. Although I was most interested in the "Create a book" tool on my Wikipedia Stephen2nd account, this tool has now disappeared from that page. So, I'll try it from here.

St. George and the Dragon:

The Science and Art of Heraldry: Since the reign of Henry III: English heraldry has been regarded as a Science, by being in possession of a system, a classification, and a technical language of its own. It is still the essence of a heraldic language to be concise yet complete, expressive, and abounding in suggestions. Repetition of any important word is scrupulously avoided; and, where it would be required, another form of expression is substituted in its stead. Much meaning is left to be implied and understood. [1]

In 1989, an Englishman with the birth-name of Stephen Mowbray McDermott, whilst researching his family history, accidentally discovered his names of STEPHEN & Mc & DERMOTT en-Cyphered on\in the Garter and motto of the: Royal Arms of the United Kingdom; This article exemplifies these cryptographic words/names as Ciphers in the Royal Arms.

God and my right hand:[edit]

Existing before all known languages, fingers, hands and Arms, have always been a means of communication, to simply point is internationally understood: The picture St. Thomas Becket faces King Henry II in a dispute; is thus described due soley to the images of their hands and fingers. The portraits of Kings Henry VIII and Richard III, both emphasise their Right Hand little fingers. Richard III is also depicted as grasping the Heraldic badge of St. George and the Dragon; suspended from the Chain of the Order of the Garter in his right hand, with specific emphasis on his Right Hand little finger: The emphasis of Right Hand, little finger and Garter, convey hidden communications.
These same emphases are repeated by King Charles I: "Charles the Martyr" by W Marshall illustrating the “Eikon Basilike”, also shows King Charles grasping the Chain of the Order of the Garter, and specifically emphasising his Right Hand little finger; depicted pointing to the letters: IN VERBO TVO SPES MEA: (In Thy Word is My Hope):
Charles also appears to be in thought about God, also thinking about a symbolic crown, whilst holding a crown of thorns of the Son of God; this crown of a circularity wreath symbolizing a never-ending circle of eternity or Crown of Immortality; See: Bilblical origins Right Hand of God or God's Right Hand: [2] alluding to his Divine Right of Kings: DIEU et mon DROIT: (GOD and my RIGHT): Hand on a Bible Right Hand raised; defines a legal Oath before God.
Eikon's emphases may be explained in reference to the Royal Arms of King Charles I; which can be seen above the main entrance of the Kings Manor, St. Leonards Place, York, near to York Minster. Henry VIII and Charles II stayed at the Kings Manor, as did Charles I (1633 & 1639): Depicting a first use of his Unicorn supporter, the Royal Motto; DIEU ET MON DROIT, has the [ N ] of MON carved in reverse. The Garter motto is also re-defined, as exampled in the Royal Arms of King Charles II (dated: 1682): (Christow Church, Devon): GARTER motto: MAL PENSE HONI SOIT QUI: Uniquely, he letter [ Y ] is missing, also the letters PENSE are between the lions paws, (i.e. Paws for thought): and the letters HONI SOIT are between the Unicorn’s hooves:[3] NB: "Dieu et mon droit" means "God and my right", also; “God and my Right Hand:”[4][5][6][7][8] (i.e. motto of George III [9]):

Cyphers in the Garter:[edit]

Royal motto of the Garter
St. George: Dragon: Motto
Victoria Cypher
English Rose
According to the Kings Council Judge; Arthur Charles Fox-Davis of the Inner Temple, the armorial historian and author; [10]Much ingenuity seems to have been expended in devising badges and mottoes which should convey an index of the name and family of the owner”. A concept repeated in the HMSO Encyclopedia: [11] Royal Arms: “Their functional purpose is the heraldic identification of the person, which should clearly identify a particular person”: The particular name on/in the Royal Arms since before King Edward III, and { on/i n } the current Royal Arms of the United Kingdom (2009) is: “Stephen Mc Dermott.”
Fox-Davis also elaborates the fact that: “there are two ciphers one within and one without the Garter.” This statement is in direct reference to his image of “The Royal Arms of Great Britain, as determined by the Warrant in the reign of Queen Victoria”: (Plate: CXIV): With reference the concept of circularity, as pertaining to the Garter; The Royal Warrant depicts eleven Royal Heraldic badges, ten of which have no Garters, and one which is encircled with a Garter. The (main) Royal Arms Garter is encircled with the Chain of the Order of the Garter, itself, containing thirteen linked Garters, which revolves each individual Garter in turn, overall a full 360 degrees. All fifteen images of the Garter contain the Royal motto of the Garter; HONI SOIT QUI MAL Y PENSE: Each of the interlinked (30 total) Chain-Garters, is centered with an English Rose.
The term; “there are two ciphers one within and one without the Garter,” is ambiguous. Fox-Davis only infers that the two ciphers are the monogram (V.R.) of Victoria Regina. However, only one of the (V.R.) Badge-Ciphers can be defined as; within a Garter. This Cipher within a Garter; is previously unknown, along with the Royal Badge of the Union Jack symbol of Britain on a shield, which was previously determined as the Duke of Wellington’s Augmentation, acquired by Prince Albert Sax Coburg-Gotha in 1852. The two Ciphers (V.R.) of Victoria Regina, may clearly identify a particular person, but, this is only one specific Cipher in reference to the Garter. However, in terms of ingenuity (in reference to heraldic identification, and an index of a name and a family): There are fifteen Cyphers, of the same name - Within the Garter itself, and also fifteen Cyphers of the same name elsewhere in the Royal Arms - Without the Garter. A Cypher of another name (Re: "ONI") Within and Without the Garter in the Royal Motto: also, seven ingenious cyphers heraldically defining terms (Mc) - on & in & Within & Without the Garter.
NB: Such ingenuity redefines Cypher as Cipher: ''Secret or disguised manner of writing, whether by characters arbitrarily invented, or by an arbitrary use of letters or characters in other than their ordinary sense, by making single words stand for sentences or phrases, or by other methods intelligible only to those possessing the key; a cryptograph:

De-Ciphering the Garter:[edit]

R/H finger pivot on MON = DERMOTT; Pense = STEPHEN
Cipher of STEPHEN in the Garter: The circulatory Garter cipher required certain procedures to be enacted, before the De-cipher could be achieved to depict its hidden name &etc. This procedure was re-discovered in the mid 17th century, in a quote attributed to Clarendon; “To open the cipher of other men’s thoughts,” i.e. PENSE defined as thinks or thoughts: THinKING representing TH in KING (KNIGHT); then when added to PENSE = King Stephen: This procedure incorporating phrases associated to ‘Think:’ (Eg: Think -on it: -about it: -it over): The next procedure referred to by Fox-Davis: “Given Pause” i.e. “Paws -for- thought.” To incorporate the “Holding between the paws,” i.e. PENSE between the lions paws: (Lion rampant: Supporter):
(Re: Think -on- IT) = PENSE -on- HONI SO IT = H-PENSE-T: (Re: Think about it) = HO:PE NSE = Charles II Eikon Cipher: "In Thy Word is my Hope";
Finally (think it over): = H-ESNEP-T: Place the "little finger" of the Right Hand as a pivot on the [ N ] of the H-ESNEP-T;
Then simply point the index finger (left and right)-(seven times)-(L:R:L:R:L:R:L): Thus, de-ciphering the Garter letters into the name of S:T:E:P:H:E:N:

De-Ciphering of the Mc:[edit]

Cipher of Mc in the Garter:

De-Ciphering the Motto:[edit]

Cipher of DERMOTT in the motto: With specific reference to the aforementioned use of the “little finger” of the Right Hand, also, with specific reference to the reversed ( N ) of motto DIEU ET MON DROIT: Place the little finger of the Right Hand as a pivot on [ N ] of MON: Then simply point the index finger (right and left)-(seven times)-(R:L:R:L:R:L:R): Thus, de-ciphering the letters and name of D:E:R:M:O:T:T: NB: Historically; the name "Mc Dermott" derives from "Mac Diarmaid;" which means DIA = GOD -of- ARMAID = ARMS:

Arms: H. T. McDermott:[edit]

Shield: (Ref: Sinister-chief-angled): Arms: Party per pale chevron argent & or, on chevron gules, between in chief three boars’ heads erased at the neck, and in base a cross crosslet azure, three trefoils or slipped of the second: Crest: A demi lion rampant or, holding between the paws a boars head erased: Motto: HONOR VIRTUTIS PRAEMIUM: (Honour and virtue is its own reward.)

Stephen M. McDermott[edit]

St. George flag: English Patron Saint
The Red Dragon

Daily Telegraph: 24 April 1996: (pg 4: St. George and the Dragon): Patron Saint with a holiday home”: “Yet for one man, St. Georges Day was the most important of all. He spent it driving around London waving the flag of St. George from his car window. He told all who would listen that his family, the Mowbrays, were hereditary enforcers of Magna Carta. Asked what he did for a living, he said: “I do this.” If his fervoir seemed un-English there may be a clue to his temperament in his full name Stephen Mowbray McDermott. (by Tom Utley)

York Minster: "Mr Stephen McDermot displayed the Royal Arms of the Red Dragon of Cadwallader in St. George's Chapel, York Minster, on Saturday 29 June 1991": NB: Stephen Mowbray McDermott and most of his ancestors, were born in Newcastle upon Tyne. England:

St. George: Flag:[edit]

Newcastle upon Tyne: England
Tynemouth Castle: England
Exemplification: Newcastle upon Tyne: Arms: Gules Three Castles triple towered argent: Crest: On a wreath of the colours: A Castle as in the arms & issuant a Demi Lion guardant supporting a flagstaff or flying a forked pennon of the arms of St. George: Motto: FORTITER DEFENDIT TRIUMPANS: Triumphing by brave defence[12]: Ref: (1575): “The most ancient insignia.” Its origins defined as Thus:
Once upon the Tyne, in 1080ad a new castle was built during at the command of William (I) the Conqueror, under the directions of his son Robert Curthose. The castle was built for to defend the Tyne Bridge, to secure a free pass for English armies returning from Scotland into Northumberland. Rufus, however, was the first to employ arms against it, against a rebellion headed by Mowbray Earl of Northumberland.
1090ad: Mowbray, re-founded and re-fortified Tynemouth monastery with cannons: In 1093ad: King Malcolm of Scotland and his son were killed against Mowbray, and his army defeated at a siege of Alnwick Castle; Malcolm and his son being interred in Tynemouth monastery.
In 1095ad: Mowbray, having “Raised the Standard” of rebellion against William Rufus, the son and successor of William the Conqueror, the King marched against the new castle with a great army, and took it after a short siege together with several of Mowbray’s partisans. Undeterred, Mowbray converted Tynemouth monastery into Tynemouth Castle: Thither, William marched with his army against Mowbray in Tynemouth Castle, and after a siege of two months took the Castle by storm. William captured his brother and made him prisoner, but Mowbray escaped and took refuge in Bamborough Castle, which William also besieged, but finding it impregnable against Mowbray, erected a fully garrisoned castle blockade it, whilst William returned south. The besieged Mowbray twice escaped to his castle of Newcastle, eventually taking sanctuary in the Tynemouth church of St. Oswin, where he was captured and made prisoner.
In 1110ad, Tynemouth Monastery Castle, which had been so much destroyed in Earl Mowbray’s insurrection, was again re-built. [13]
The two Lions of the Dukes of Normandy descended through the Mowbray Earls of Northumberland: Richard Duke of Normandy’s daughter Harwise, was Geofrey Duke of Brittany’s wife. Their son Eudon, was father of Hawise, wife of Stephen (Comes Britannia), Lord of Richmond. Stephen was father of Maud, the mother of Alice, wife of Roger de Mowbray; son of Robert Mowbray and Maud the daughter of Judith, daughter of the Earl of Chester. See Letters Patent Richard II: Earl of Chester - Mowbray:

St. George: Dragon:[edit]

Red Dragon
Magna Carta
The Royal Crest: Mowbray England
Arms: Diarmaid Arms: Ireland
Arms: Moubray Arms: Scotland
Duke Normandy Northumberland
The Royal Arms Mowbray England
Mowbray: Aug:
The Royal Arms
The Dragon: is one of the most ancient of signs. It is carved on the corners of the Temple of Persepolis. Nothing is of so high account among the Chinese as representations of Dragons. Dragons were the Parthians’ ensigns, from whom the Romans in later times took them; and our Saxon ancestors from the Romans. It was also the device of the ancient British kings, as the lion was of the Norman Dukes; (Ref*: Earls of Northumberland). The chariot of the Ceridiven, the Ceres of the Druids, was drawn by dragons, creatures esteemed sacred by that ancient priesthood. Hence the beautiful lines of Gray, when celebrating the triumph of Owen, descended from Cadwallader, a name signifying supreme ruler of battle:
Dauntless on his native sands; The dragon-son of Mona stands: In glittering arms and glory drest; High he rears his ruby crest.
Dragon Badge: Arms: [14] :See also: Royal Standard of England
Royal Badge: Henry VII: Uncrowned red dragon: Motto: Y DDRAIG GOCH DDYRY CYCHWYN (The Red dragon gives the lead)
NB: Red Dragon Standard: Richard I (Crusades): Royal Arms Supporter; & Badge: Henry VII: Henry VIII: Edward VI: Mary I: Elizabeth I:
Royal Badge: May 2008: (Replacing the Dragon and motto): Imperial crown atop a continuous scroll: together with a wreath consisting of the heraldic plant emblems of the four countries of the United Kingdom: New motto: PLEIDIOL WYF I'M GWLAD (I am true to my country)


KINGS STATUTE: LETTERS PATENT: (C12th):
Letters Patent: Written proprietary claim of right granted by a Sovereign to a designated person in a form open for public inspection [15] Patent (Disambiguation): A grant to a person conferring right or title: Ingenious or well contrived process:
John I: Statute Letters Patent: (9 John: 1207-08):
Letters Patent: "BRAY" ( Mow ):– "CASTLE": - "DERMOTT": - "STEPHEN": 1177ad:
Richard II: Statute: Letters Patent:
Letters Patent: Decree: Mowbray (Royal Crest & Lion's Rampant: Ostrich Feathers): Earl Marshal: Earl of Chester: Prince of Wales: Heir apparent: Inseperatably linked 1398: The son of Edward I. was Thomas Brotherton, who’s daughter Margaret was wife of John Segrave. Their daughter Elizabeth, was wife of John Mowbray; son of John Mowbray and Joan, daughter of Henry Duke of Lancaster, grandson of Henry III[16]
Henry VI: Letters Patent: Barony by Writ: Exclusively male heirs of Henry VII: Recognised Peers (1489): Peers enobled by Letters Patent: Earls of Ulster: Earl de Courcey (1181) de Lacy (1205) (Mowbray): de Burgh (1264) Plantagenet (1354-1425) Margaret Brotherton (Wife of John Segrave): Duchess of Norfolk: Honour of Carlow: Bigood > (NB: D' Aubigny > Moubray = Royal Scottish Lion & Tressure): (1245) Plantagenet (1306) Segrave (1397) Mowbray (1399)
James I : Letters Patent: Writ of Summons: *(his own) Hereditary Scots Peerages: Kingdom of Scots: Angus; Buchan; Caithness; Carrick (McDermott & Mowbray ); Fife; Galloway; Mar (McDermott & Mowbray); March (Mowbray); James I: Letters Patent: Rockingham; "Illuminated Patent by Indented Deed: 1640ad: Patrimony of MacDermot lineage including 389 Quarters extending over eight centuries (Circa 840ad to 1640ad):
James II: Letters Patent: Writ of Summons: *(his own) Hereditary Irish Peerages: Ulster (1205) Carrick (McDermott and Mowbray) (1315) Kildare (McDermott) (1316) Louth (1319) Ormond (1328) Desmond (McDermott) (1329) Waterford (1446) : James II; ""expressed words"" his Irish predecessors:


A Message from his Majesty the King:

To all serving in my Forces by sea or land, or in the air, and indeed, to all my people engaged in the defence of the Realm, I commend the reading of this book. For centuries the Bible has been a wholesome and strengthening influence in our national life, and it behoves us in these momentous days to turn with renewed faith to this Divine source of comfort and inspiration.” [17]

King James version of the Holy Bible:

Great and manifold were the blessings, most dread Sovereign, which Almighty God, the father of all mercies, bestowed upon us the people of England, when first he sent your Majesties Royal Person to rule and reign over us... We may rest secure and supported within the truth and innocency of a good conscience, which will ever give countenance to honest and Christian endeavours against bitter censures and uncharitable imputations.

Stephen2nd (talk) 17:42, 25 December 2008 (UTC)

Researched Citations:[edit]

Royal Motto: DIEU ET MON DROIT: On the scroll, on the Royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom.
  1. English Heraldry: Boutell (1904)
  2. Holy Bible: Acts 7:55, Mark 14:62 of the New Testament and Psalm 63:8 in the Old Testament;
  3. Heraldic & Genealogical Notes From Devon Churches: Mike Brown: Dartmoor Press: (2002):
  4. Kearsley’s Complete Peerage” (1799) - Translation of Mottos: (xxiii)
  5. An Historical Encyclopedia (Pg 227).by M E Snodgrass, (2003)
  6. Questions and Answers Notes and Queries” (Pg 109) by M de Albuquerque (1906)
  7. Americana – (Pg 437): American Historical Society (1926)
  8. History of American Genealogy (Pg 112) by RB Ferrall (1981)
  9. Kearsley’s Complete Peerage” (1799) - Translation of Mottos: (xxiii)
  10. Art of Heraldry; Encyclopedia of Armory. A.C. Fox-Davis. (1908) ISBN: 0906223342.
  11. The Royal Encyclopaedia: Crown copyright (1991). ISBN: 0333538102:
  12. City and County of Newcastle upon Tyne: College of Arms: (Exemplification (1954)):
  13. Sykes: Local Records: Historical Register of Remarkable Events: (Pg.13-16): (1833):
  14. Art of Heraldry; Encyclopedia of Armory. A.C. Fox-Davis. (1908) ISBN: 0906223342.
  15. Merriam Webster’s Dictionary (2007):
  16. The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom ISBN 0-904387-82-8
  17. George VI: 15 September (1936): King James Bible: Active Service Edition.

External links:[edit]

  • Free access to Burke's General Armory (incomplete, 1,500 British surnames), Pimbley's Dictionary of Heraldry and Blason des familles d'Europe, Grand Armorial Universel (15,000 European surnames)
  • King James Bible
  • User:Stephen2nd/Sandbox (c) - Extended historical references etc.


Template:Monarchism

The St. George Flag of England.

NB: This page is an extended reference source for: User talk:Stephen2nd/Sandbox (c)


In 1989, a person with the birth-name of Stephen Mowbray McDermott, whilst researching his family history, accidentally discovered the names of "STEPHEN" and "DERMOTT" en-Cyphered in the Garter and motto of the: Royal Arms of the United Kingdom. Royal Arms of Great Britain, contains a bulleted list of citations, representing a brief armorial reference history of Stephen Mowbray McDermott (29-06-1952): Combined with numerous historical references and images of this science of heraldry, to define the many; Cyphers in the Royal Arms. Stephen2nd (talk) 02:00, 19 January 2009 (UTC)

DIEU ET MON DROIT[edit]

REF: Translations: DIEU ET MON DROIT: (Meanings): (1): God and my right: (2): God and my right hand: [7][8][9][10][11] (3): God and my lawful right: [12] (4): God and my right shall me defend: [13]The meaning of Dieu et mon droit is God and my right. However, according to “Kearsley’s Complete Peerage” (1799): Dieu et mon Droit meaning “God and my right hand” was the motto of King George III. Kearsley’s Peerage; printed June 1799, appeared during publication of the 1st Edition (1796-1808): of the German “Brockhaus Encyclopedia;” emphasizing the raising of the ‘Right Hand’ during installations and coronations of German Kings. Later interpretations quote Dieu et mon droit, stands for "God and my lawful right" and not "God and my right hand.":Heraldic Usage: DIEU ET -&- MON DROIT: Most depictions of the Royal Arms separate the DIEU ET from the MON DROIT: The DIEU ET is always depicted beneath the rear/bottom feet (paws: hooves: claws) of the dexter (right) Royal supporter i.e. The Lion or Boar. The MON DROIT is always depicted beneath the rear feet of the sinister Royal supporter i.e. The Greyhound, Dragon or Unicorn. The DIEU ET (on its own) is also listed among terminologies of giving an oath. [14] The MON DROIT (on its own) is further quoted in terminology meaning: " My right hand ":[15] The DROIT (on its own) is quoted as meaning in French; law; a legal title, claim or due.[16]:Royal Banners: DIEU ET MON –&- DROYT: (SEE: Royal Standard of England): (Banners: [17]): All Royal Standards separate the DIEU ET MON from the DROYT. As can be seen in the Banners of Edward III: Richard II: Edward IV: Henry V ( 2 ): Henry VII ( 2 ): NB: Under Cromwell, (Commonwealth) his motto separates PAX QUAERITUR from BELLO: NB: The Earl of Mar (Scotland) motto separates JE PENSE from PLUS: The "ET MON DROIT" contains the D:E:R:M:O:T:T cypher, as exemplified in: Talk:Dieu et mon droit and User talk:Stephen2nd/Sandbox (c)

MacDiarmid: ("dia = god; armaid = of arms"):[edit]

File:CaractacusClaudius.jpg
King Caradoc Caratacus before the Emperor Claudius: Circa 50ad.
Beauchamp (1344): Checky Arms: Earl Mar: & Duke Rothesay: & Mowbray.
Beauchamp
  • Armorial bearings of H. T. McDermott: St. Leonards on Sea:[1] (Place on c):
  • Shield: Sinister-chief-angle: Arms: Party per pale chevron argent & or, on chevron gules, between in chief three boars’ heads erased at the neck, and in base a cross crosslet azure, three trefoils or slipped of the second: Crest: demi lion rampant or, holding between the paws a boars head erased: Motto: HONOR VIRTUTIS PRAEMIUM: (Honour & virtue its own reward.)[2]
  • Mr. Wimberley Heraldry Lecture: (Re: Peerage listing): Doncaster: December 11, 1841:
  1. Dauntless on his native sands
    The dragon- son of MON-a stands:
    In glittering arms and glory drest,
    High he rears his ruby crest.
The three wheat-sheaves (Earl of Chester) represent abundance and hospitality: Three boars’ heads (McDermott ) the ancient roast beef of old England, is found on many shields of the old families of Anglia, Cambria, and Caledonia. In Scotland, it was sometimes surrounded by little banners, displaying the colours and achievements of the hospitable baron".
  • Caradoc Caratacus: (10 AD – 50 AD): (Pre-Iceni; Celtic Brigantes tribe): Reign C1st, to circa 50 AD: Born c. 10 AD ?: Died after c. 50 AD:
  • Arms: Party per pale chevron argent, on a chevron gules, between in chief two boars’ heads, and in base one boars’ head azure, three wheat-sheaves or: Motto: CARADOC in chief: TRADITUS NON VICTUS in base: (Betrayed not conquered):
  • Crest 1: Caratacus fully armoured & Crowned or, kneeling one knee, oval Shield on left arm, and holding a Sword by blade in right hand, presented handle tipped with Ruby crest:
  • Crest 2: Caratacus wearing a Kilt & Crowned or, kneeling one knee, oval Shield on left arm, and holding a Sword by blade in right hand, presented handle tipped with Ruby crest:
  • NB: Caratacus: Party per pale chevron: Chevron gules: Three Boars heads: Three Wheat-sheaves or: (NB: Earl of Chester):
  • NB: McDermott: Party per pale chevron: Chevron gules: Four Boars heads: Three Trefoils or: (NB: Royal Arms - Royal Badge):
  • Rockingham: Patent 12 James I.; illuminated patent: Indented Deed dated 1640ad: Patrimony of MacDermot lineage, including 389 quarters, extending over eight centuries: Last record: per se as “Driven from his ancient patrimony during Cromwellian Wars.”
  • Campbell - MacDiarmid: Malcolm of the clan went to Norman France where he married an heiress of the Beauchamp family and adopted that name. A son Archibald accompanied the Conqueror (1066) becoming founder to several English lines. [3]
  • 35 Hen. VIII, c. 1 (1544): Succession determined by last Will (1546) of Henry VIII. Settling the Crown of England upon his children, after extinction of her legitimate descendants, the succession "shall wholly remain and come to the next rightful heirs." Edward Seymour, Lord Beauchamp (b.1561), his 3 sons; 3 daughters and brother, were all named as successors to the English Crown and English Throne.

Mowbray (2nd Plantaganet) Royal Family:[edit]

Duke Normandy
Mowbray Label three points 1st born son
  • Letters Patent granted to Thomas Mowbray and to his heirs (Earl Marshal) Statute 1397. Earl of Chester: Prince of Wales; Heir Apparent; (titles linked): Statute: 1398 Richard II; Royal Arms inc; Edward the Confessor: Three Lions: (NB: England; Duke of Lancaster & Brotherton ): Two Lions Rampant: Royal Crest: ("of the King"): "Two" Ostrich Feathers: Mowbray Duke of Norfolk: (d.1400): Heraldic Achievements originally outside Doges Palace, Venice: NB: Ref: Doge: "Rank of a Sovereign Prince": Ref: “Three” Ostrich Feathers: [4] NB: Ostrich feather silver & pen gold is the King’s: Feather all silver is the Prince of Wales: Feather gold & pen ermine is the Duke of Lancaster’s: [A C F-D]:
  • Richard Duke of Normandy’s daughter Harwise, was Geofrey Duke of Brittany’s wife. Their son Eudon, was father of Hawise, wife of Stephen (Comes Britannia), Lord of Richmond. Stephen was father of Maud, the mother of Alice, wife of Roger de Mowbray; son of Robert Mowbray and Maud the daughter of Judith, daughter of the Earl of Chester. NB: Earl of Chester & Caratacus: Arms: three Wheat-sheaves or:
  • The son of Edward I. was Thomas Brotherton, who’s daughter Margaret was wife of John Segrave. Their daughter Elizabeth, was wife of John Mowbray, who was son of John Mowbray and Joan, the daughter of Henry Duke of Lancaster, the grandson of Henry III.
  • Usurped again; the (McDermott) "Roscommon Case" (1828); (McDermott & Mowbray) "Earldom of Mar Case" (1875); "Mowbray Segrave Case" ( Mowbray as Earl of March) (1877); (Mowbray) "Earldom of Norfolk Case" (1907); and (100 years after (McDermott) "Roscommon Case" ); again in the (Mowbray McDermott) "Beauchamp Case" (1925).
  • Following the "Norfolk Case" (1907); in 1909 Fox –Davis published ‘Complete Guide to Heraldry’: (Page 466). Ref; "Mowbray Segrave Case" (1877) Quote Ref: “Brotherton; and Mowbray Segrave; The Mowbrays, as recognised members of the Royal Family.[7]

Mowbray McDermott: Records: (C19th - C20th)[edit]

King Edward the Confessor.
Richard II: Mowbray's cousin
  • Successive; patrilineal; eldest (1st born McDermott) sons, James McDermott: (b.1920: m.1951: d.1986): Recorded (Brotherton witness) as 1st born; Mowbray & McDermott heir.
  • By James’s (1st) marriage; his first (1st born) son; also James, (b.1948): (d.1965) aged 17. By (2nd) marriage; succeeded by surviving second (1st born) son & heir; Stephen 2nd:
  • MacDonnel m. Connor: Son: Connor MacDonnel (Named: McDonald) (b.1891): Drummond m. Campbell: Dau: Campbell Drummond (b.1875): Nicholson m. Drummond: (m.1926):
  • McDermott m. Mowbray (m.1919) = Son: James McDermott m. Kathleen McDonald (b.1928: m.1951)
  • Stephen (1st born son.) (b.29 June 1952): Peter; (b. 4 August 1953): Anthony; (b. 4 August 1953: d.26 December 1988):

Arms of Newcastle upon Tyne: England:[edit]

Newcastle
  • Ref: College of Arms: Exemplification 1954: Newcastle upon Tyne: Arms: Gules '''Three Castles triple towered''' argent: Crest: On a wreath of the colours: A Castle as in the arms & issuant a Demi Lion guardant supporting a flagstaff or flying a forked pennon of the arms of St. George: Motto: FORTITER DEFENDIT TRIUMPANS: Triumphing by brave defence[8]: NB: Ref: Norroy CoA (1575): “The most ancient insignia.”
  • Newcastle Arms: Demi Lion: England: St. George: Three Castles triple towered: NB: (Newcastle Museum exhibit): (same crest but) Demi Lion flying Saltire of Scotland:
William Conqueror

Kings Statutes at large: (1177 – 1640):[edit]

John, Stephen and Mowbray signing Magna Carta: 15 June 1215.
Duke of Lancaster John of Gaunt Arms: Castle Triple Towered:
RICHARD III little finger Right hand
James I & IV
  • King John: Statute: Magna Carta: 15 June 1215ad:
  • Mowbray: "One of the 25 Barons appointed to enforce the provisions of Magna Carta": (NB: Letters Patent: "and to his heirs "":
  • By the Grace of God King of England: Know that before God: To all free men of our Kingdom: We have granted for us and our heirs forever:
  • No free man shall be seized or imprisoned, or stripped of his rights, or possessions, or outlawed, or exiled, or deprived of his standing:
  • Nor will we proceed with force against him, or send others to do so: To no one will be sell, to no one deny right or justice:
  • That men in our Kingdom shall have and keep all these liberties, rights and concessions, well and peaceably in their fullness and entirety:
  • For them and their heirs, of us and our heirs, in all things and all places; Forever.
  • John I: Statute Letters Patent: (9 John: 1207-08): Letters Patent: "BRAY" ( Mow ):– "CASTLE": - "DERMOTT": - "STEPHEN": [1177]:
  • Lord of Cork (grant) to Robert Fitz Stephen (1177): Stephen de Longue Espee: (NB: Arms: York Minster ):
  • Lord of Kerry (grant) to Earl of Desmond: (Fitz) Gerald [1450] by descent to Mc Dermot: NB: (Ref: Mc & Mac & Fitz = son of ):
  • Lord - Kingdom of Connaught [grant Hen II] to de Courcey. Earl of Ulster. [Grant 1175] to King of Connaught, [King under Henry II]: Hugh, King of Connaught to King John. [grant 1227] to de Burgh Lord of Connaught. s, Walt Earl of Ulster [1243] via Plantagenet; Mortimer; Mowbray [2nd] Plantagenet: Connaught descent to Edward IV:
  • Richard II: Statute: (grant): Royal Arms of England: Edward Confessor: Three Lions: Label of three points: NB: Duke of Lancaster: Brotherton:
  • Richard II: Statute: (grant) Arms: Two Lions Rampant: Royal Crest: ("of the King"): "Two" and "Three" Ostrich Feathers:
  • Richard II: Letters Patent: Mowbray Earl Marshal: Decree 1398: Earl of Chester: Prince of Wales: Heir apparent: Titles inseperatably linked:
  • Henry VI: Letters Patent: Palatine Honours: Barony by Writ: Irish Baronage composed exclusively of male heirs of Henry VII: recognised Peers [1489]: Peers enobled by Letters Patent: Lord-Earl Palatine (cinctus gladio) Ulster: Ulster Earl de Courcey [1181] de Lacy [1205] (NB: Mowbray): de Burgh [1264] Plantagenet [1354-1425] Margaret Brotherton (Wife; John Segrave) Duchess of Norfolk: Lady of Catherlogh - Honour of Carlow: Bigood = (NB: + D' Aubigny + Moubray = Royal Scots lion & tressure): [1245] Plantagenet [1306] Segrave [1397] Mowbray [1399]

Royal Standards: College of Heralds (MS. 1590):[edit]

Arms: King Robert I of Scotland: Queen Isabella of Mar.
Arms: King Robert III of Scotland: Queen Annabella Drummond: marriage records (C20th).
  • Henry V: Arms: The Cross of St. George: Argent and azure: A Swan with wings displayed argent, beaked gules, membered sable, ducally gorged and chained or, between three "STUMPS OF TREES ", one in dexter chief, and two in base of the last:
DIEU ET MON: Two stumps of trees in pale or:
DROYT: Five stumps of trees, three in chief, and two in base:
DIEU ET MON: A rose- gules in chief, rose- argent in base:
DROYT: In chief three roses gules, in base two argent:
Comptes de Mar
Aubigny=Moubray
JE PENSE: A hand from a Cap of Maintenance ermine, couped at the wrist, holding a dagger erect, it’s blade within an Earls coronet in chief: (NB: BADGE: it’s blade within the word PENSE on - two Ostrich feather - Mar Garter): (NB: PENSE: See Motto of the Order of the Garter ):
PLUS: Demi Lion in chief on Cap of Maintenance ermine in base:
  • Mowbray Arms: Demi lion augmentation: Royal Tressure of Scotland: upon arms of the Earl of Mar: NB: Checky Arms (3rd quarter) (NB: Beauchamp Seal ): Donald Earl of Mar: Stewart Earl of Galloway: Stewart de Rothesay: Duke of Rothesay:

Cipher Records: Heraldic (family) Trees:[edit]

Mowbray Howard (demi lion) Augmentation
Duke of Lancaster & St. George:
  • In 1897, Joseph Grego of the Kernoozer's Club; “Armour-club par excellence in the world;” published numerous Cipher references to dignitaries and royalty; "Duke of Wellington: Mr. Coffin: Mr. Graves: NB: 325g Carlyle Relic: James FitzJames Stephen KCSI 1st bt: Prince of Wales":[12]
  • Published two decades before my fathers birth; James: (Fitz) James: and Stephen, were the first names, of the three successive Mowbray McDermott; 1st born sons. Moreover, the “date of creation” of this (“Stephen”. KCSI (Cipher) 1st bart) was on 29 June 1852. Following James (Snr & Jnr); Stephen Mowbray McDermott was born on 29 June 1952. Parallels were also found in (McDermott) Mowbray; birth and marriage records, such as Prince Albert’s descendant's being named the same as (earlier) Mowbray birth names, also including the same parallel that Lord Stourton: (NB: Mowbray Segrave Case: 1877: Created Lord Mowbray and Segrave) also named his 1st born son Stephen in 1953.
  • 1852: Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg, appointed himself to several offices left vacant by the death of Duke of Wellington, including mastership of Trinity House[13]: (NB: Newcastle upon Tyne:[14] ): Arms: (St. George): Crest: demi-lion rampant: (NB: Demi Lion Crest: McDermott: [15]: Wellington: [16]: Newcastle upon Tyne:[17]): Prince Albert also determined the Wellington Augmentation:[18]: British Union Jack flag on shield, as a Royal Badge imperially crowned: As represented on: “The Royal Arms of Great Britain, as determined by the Warrant, in the reign of Queen Victoria.” [19]: "These badges which appear on the Sovereign’s warrant, are never assigned to any other member of the Royal Family, of whom the Prince of Wales is the only one who rejoices in the possession of officially assigned badges": NB: York Minster: Royal Harp Badge: On McDermott-Haig Cadet [20]:) Arms.
  • 29th June 1991: York Minster: Chapter Clerk: Signed statements: Quote: "The Duke of Wellingtons crest is a (Demi) Lion Rampant holding the flag of St. George". Also: "On the Duke of Wellingtons memorial brass in All Saints Chapel, the name J McDERMOTT appears." The All Saints Chapel, (Duke of Wellingtons Regimental Chapel), is above the Rockingham (McDermott) family vault, which is directly opposite (due north) the St. Stephen Chapel (Cipher-Key-Gate), being above the Mowbray family vault: The Mowbray and McDermott family vaults each being either side of the York Minster Main Altar: The Stained-Glass window in All Saints Chapel, depict Mowbray arms of the Howard Augmentation:
  • The 1919 Mowbray McDermott marriage certificate also contains numerous, personal and heraldic, references to SAW'S and TREE'S:

York Minster: The Red Dragon of Cadwallader:[edit]

YORK MINSTER. ENGLAND:
Stephen: STEP REG 19 AN.


  • Following the “Aylesford Case” (1885); George Cokayne published Volume 1. of the 'Complete Peerage' books: (A – Bo) (1887); the "Earldom of Mar Case" (1875); and "Mowbray Segrave Case" (1877) were published by Cokayne; Volume 5. (L - M) 1893.
  • Royal family to McDermott: 12 April 1954: "McDermott children - An organisation (Ref: Privy Council) will look into your case and see whether there is anything that can be done." (Re: BBM.): NB: James Mowbray McDermott Jnr; Born 1st August 1948. (Re: BBM: died in Australia on 28th July 1965, aged 17.)
  • "Daily Mirror" 28 September 1991. Lord Chamberlain (Quote: 1969) "Bury the King (?) and prepare Charles as Prince of Wales."
  • York: 11 December 1969: Mowbray# & McDermott#: Family vaults# in York Minster: Prince of Wales Official Visit. "The Minster was very glad to welcome the prince of wales (NB: and his High Steward, Lord Halifax) on Friday 11 December, in the course of his official visit. He spent over an hour in the Minster. At his own request his visit was primarily to see the archaelogical excavations#, in all of this he showed great interest."
  • "Plate III: Royal Commission: Archaelogical excavations#; Photography down there was not easy. But time was against us, not only were the Dean and Chapter quite naturally anxious for us to vacate the vault#, but with the change in equilibrium caused by the chamber being newly reopened, the coffins had begun to leak. Working fast together, the RCHM photographer, John Bassham and I completed the photographs. Even so, before we had finished, our feet were paddling in the unpleasentness leaking from the coffins."
  • 13 June 1991: Narroy and Ulster King of Arms: College of Arms: “Stephen McDermott's Red Dragon of Cadwallader has a label of three points." NB: 15 June 1991: Trooping the Colour: Notified; CoA: Inner & Middle Temple; NSY; Displayed my Red Dragon banner, fitted with its corresponding Royal Arms standard (“Flag of the Prince” – R-W-B & Royal Arms) before all assembled public and military witnesses, to Queen Elizabeth II, her family and dignitaries, at Trooping the Colour parade in London. NB: Being one year prior, to the 777th anniversary of (Mowbray) signing Magna Carta (15 June 1215): NB: I was born two weeks after 737th Magna Carta: 1952 Year of the Dragon:
  • 29th June 1991: York Minster: Chapter Clerk: Signed statement: Quote:
"Mr Stephen McDermot displayed the Royal Arms of the Red Dragon of Cadwallader in St. George Chapel, York Minster, on Saturday 29 June 1991."

Mowbray Segrave Case: House of Lords 1877:[edit]

Royal Arms England: Label three points: (1st born son).


  • Quote: “The findings of any Committee for Privileges or the decision of the House itself are not necessarily binding on their successors in other cases ("there are good precedents for this contention".) But it may be still open to the Crown to ""try it on again"" in precisely the same form, that a Committee for Privileges and a House with a different personnel, and in the altered circumstances of the status and powers of the Chamber, would come to a different decision.”


  • Affidavit of Throne Succession: (prior claim): 1994:


ISBN: References:[edit]

  1. Art of Heraldry; Encyclopedia of Armory. A.C. Fox-Davis. (1908) ISBN: 0906223342.
  2. Art of Heraldry; Encyclopedia of Armory. A.C. Fox-Davis. (1908) ISBN: 0906223342.
  3. Campbell. p55: Collins Guide: Scots Kith and King: A Guide to the Clans and Surnames of Scotland. ISBN: 0004356659.
  4. Archaeologia: (1842): Vol. XXIX: App. 387:
  5. The General Armory of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales.
  6. Heraldry. Sources, Symbols and Meaning. Neubecker (1977). ISBN: 0316641413. pg 164.
  7. A C Fox-Davis: (1909): A Complete Guide to Heraldry:
  8. City and County of Newcastle upon Tyne: College of Arms: (Exemplification 1954):
  9. Art of Heraldry; Encyclopedia of Armory. A.C. Fox-Davis. (1908) ISBN: 0906223342.
  10. Art of Heraldry; Encyclopedia of Armory. A.C. Fox-Davis. (1908) ISBN: 0906223342.
  11. G.E. Cokayne: The Complete Peerage: 2nd Edition:
  12. Victoria Era Exhibition (catalogue. pg 45: 325a to 325h: 1897):
  13. Art of Heraldry; Encyclopedia of Armory. A.C. Fox-Davis. (1908) ISBN: 0906223342.
  14. Art of Heraldry; Encyclopedia of Armory. A.C. Fox-Davis. (1908) ISBN: 0906223342.
  15. Art of Heraldry; Encyclopedia of Armory. A.C. Fox-Davis. (1908) ISBN: 906223342.
  16. Art of Heraldry; Encyclopedia of Armory. A.C. Fox-Davis. (1908) ISBN: 0906223342.
  17. City and County of Newcastle upon Tyne: College of Arms: (Exemplification 1954):
  18. Art of Heraldry; Encyclopedia of Armory. A.C. Fox-Davis. (1908) ISBN: 0906223342.
  19. Art of Heraldry; Encyclopedia of Armory. A.C. Fox-Davis. (1908) ISBN: 0906223342.
  20. Art of Heraldry; Encyclopedia of Armory. A.C. Fox-Davis. (1908) ISBN: 0906223342.
  21. Heraldry. Sources, Symbols and Meaning. Neubecker (1977). ISBN: 0316641413. pg 164.
  22. Heraldry. Sources, Symbols and Meaning. Neubecker (1977). ISBN: 0316641413. pg 164.


Mowbray Military Services ( Hereditary ): 1106 to 1485 :[edit]

G. Cokayne: 'Complete Peerage' records: ( Published 1893 ):[edit]

1. Mowbray: 1106: ( Tinchebrai ): Robert Curthose: / Ref: Earl of Chester

2. Mowbray: 1119: ( Norman Rebellion ):

3. Mowbray: 1123: ( Cotentin & Bremule ): In command. Took castle of Monfort-sur-Risle. Victory over the French King.

4. Mowbray: 1138: ( Battle of Standard ): Expedition against the Scots.

5. Mowbray: 1140: ( Lincoln ): Fought for King Stephen.

6. Mowbray: 1147: ( Second Crusade ): Vanquished a Saracen champion in single combat.

7. Mowbray: 1173: ( Scotland v England ): With King William of Scotland.

8. Mowbray: 1186: ( Crusades ): Jerusalem.

9. Mowbray: 1187: ( Hittin ): Taken prisoner and ransomed by Knight Templars, who “granted him and his heirs special privileges.”

10. Mowbray: 1189: ( Crusades ): One of the pledges in Germany for King Richard’s ransom. Present at King Richard I, coronation.

11. Mowbray: 1193: ( Germany - Spiers ): Returned with King Richard I, from Palestine.

12. Mowbray: 1197: ( Flanders ): With King Richard I, in Normandy.

13. Mowbray: 1201: ( Kings Service ): Abroad.

14. Mowbray: 1205: ( Normandy ): Witnessed Royal Charter at York.

15. Mowbray: 1210: ( Ireland ): With King John’s expedition.

16. Mowbray: 1215: ( Runnymede ): Enforcer of rights & provisions of Magna Carta

17. Mowbray: 1217: ( Lincoln ): Taken prisoner; for Louis against King Henry.

18. Mowbray: 1220: ( Byham ): With the King at the Siege of Byham.

19. Mowbray: 1223: ( Welsh ): Defaulted in his service.

20. Mowbray: 1230: ( France ): Sailed with expedition in the Kings invasion.

21. Mowbray: 1257: ( Kings Service v Scotland ): NB: Also: 1257; 1291; 1296; 1306-1309; 1319; 1327; 1333-1337; 1341-1346; 1355-1356.

22. Mowbray: 1260: ( Chester v Llewelyn ): Dictated terms of truce.

23. Mowbray: 1282: (Kings Service v Welsh ): Married Maud; eldest dau/heir of William de Beauchamp.

24. Mowbray: 1283: ( Shrewsbury ): Summonsed to Assembly.

25. Mowbray: 1287: ( Gloucester ): Summonsed

26. Mowbray: 1291: ( Kings Service v Scotland ): Military Council.

27. Mowbray: 1294: ( Kings Service v Gascony ): Barony by Writ

28. Mowbray: 1295: ( Created Lord Mowbray ): Married Roese; dau of Richard De Clare.

29. Mowbray: 1306 1309: ( Kings Service v Scotland ) Knighted with King Edward (Prince of Wales). Dunstable (Tournament) Arms; Lion Rampant.

30. Mowbray: 1312 1315: ( Northern Campaign ): Appointed Keeper: 10/7/12 City of York & Yorkshire County: 23/3/15 Captain & Keeper: Newcastle upon Tyne & Northumberland County.

31. Mowbray: 1317: ( Edward II v Lancaster ):

32. Mowbray: 1318: ( West Rising ): Attended Parliament

33. Mowbray: 1319: ( Kings Service v Scotland ): Accepted Scottish surrender.

34. Mowbray: 1318 1323: ( Lords Marches v Despencers )

35. Mowbray: 1321: ( Lancaster v Borough bridge ) Besieged Tickhill Castle, against the King.

36. Mowbray: 1321 1322: ( Imprisoned ): Tower of London

37. Mowbray: 1329: ( Amiens ): With Edward III, homage to King of France.

38. Mowbray: 1333: ( Berwick ): Won Berwick

39. Mowbray: 1334 1337: ( Kings Service v Scotland ): Naval Commander.

40. Mowbray: 1338: ( Sussex ): Defence of Sussex coast of England.

41. Mowbray: 1341 1346: ( Kings Service v Scotland ): Occupation. Borders. Led the 3rd battle at Neville’s Cross.

42. Mowbray: 1342: ( Brittany - Brest): Campaign

43. Mowbray: 1346: ( Berwick Campaign): Garrison

44. Mowbray: 1350: ( Kings Service v Spain ): Naval Commander at Winchelsea.

45. Mowbray: 1353: ( York ): Commissioner, defence of Yorkshire.

46. Mowbray: 1355 1356: ( Kings Service v Scotland ): Accepted the surrender of Balliol.

47. Mowbray: 1355 1356: ( Kings Service v France ): Naval Commander. Bretagne Campaign. Invasion of France.

48. Mowbray: 1367: ( France ): Created Knight Chevalier.

49. Mowbray: 1368: ( Kings Service v Saracens ): Created Earl of Nottingham.

50. Mowbray: 1382: ( Created Earl Marshal ):

51. Mowbray: 1397: ( Created Duke of Norfolk ):

52. Mowbray: 1404: ( Beheaded ):

53. Mowbray: 1485: ( Bosworth Field ): Slain.

54. Mowbray: 1877: ( Mowbray Segrave Case ): "Extraordinary descisions." House of Lords Committee.



Stephen2nd (talk) 23:06, 19 January 2009 (UTC)

Royal badges of England[edit]

Tudor Rose: Queen Elizabeth I
William Rufus
A Flower of five foils:
Henry I
A Flower of eight foils:
Stephen I
A Flower of seven foils: A Sagittarius: Plume of Ostrich Feathers: Motto, “Vi nulla invertitur ordo” (No force alters their fashion)
Henry II
The Planta-genista: An Escarbuncle: A Sword and Olive branch
Richard I
A Star of thirteen rays and a Crescent: A Star issuing from a Crescent: A mailed Arm grasping a broken Lance, with the motto – “Christo Duce:”
John, and Henry III
A Star issuing from a Crescent:
Edward I
An heraldic rose or, stalked ppr:
Edward II
A Castle of Castile:
Edward III
A Fleur-de-lys: A Sword: A Falcon: A Gryphon: The Stock (stump) of a Tree: Rays issuing from a Cloud:
Richard II
A White Hart Lodged: The Stock (stump) of a Tree: A White Falcon: The Sun in Splendor: The Sun Clouded:
Henry IV
The Monogram (cipher) SS: A crowned Eagle: An Eagle displayed: A White Swan: A Red Rose: A Columbine Flower: A Fox’s Tail: A crowned Panther: The Stock (stump) of a Tree: A Crescent:
Joan of Navarre
An Ermine, or Genet:
Henry V
A Fire-beacon: A White Swan gorged and chained: A Chained Antelope:
Henry VI
Two Ostrich Feathers in Saltire: A Chained Antelope: A Panther:
Edward IV
A White Rose en Soleil: A White Wolf and White Lion: A White Hart: A Black Dragon and Black Bull: A Falcon and Fetter-lock:: The Sun in Splendor:
Henry VII
A Rose of York and Lancaster: A Portcullis and a Fleur-de-lis, all of them Crowned: A Red Dragon: A White Greyhound: A Hawthorn Bush and Crown, with the Cypher H.R.
Henry VIII
The same, without the Hawthorn Bush, and with a White Cock:
Catherine of Aragon
A Rose, Pomegranate, and Sheaf of Arrows:
Anne Boleyn
A Crowned Falcon, holding a Sceptre,
Jane Seymour
A Phoenix rising from a Castle, between two Tudor Roses:
Catherine Parr
A Maidens Head Crowned, rising from a large Tudor Rose:
Edward VI
A Tudor Rose: The Sun in Splendor:
Mary
A Tudor Rose impaling a Pomegranate – also impaling a Sheath of Arrows, ensigned with a Crown, and surrounded with Rays: A Pomegranate:
Elizabeth
A Tudor Rose, with the motto, “Rosa sine Spina” (a Rose without a Thorn): A Crowned Falcon and Sceptre: her motto, “Semper Edem” (Always the same):
James I
A Thistle: A Thistle and Rose dimidiated and Crowned, with motto, “Beati Pacifici” (Blessed are the peacemakers):
Charles I, Charles II, James II.
Same Badge as James I, without his motto:
Anne
A Rose-Branch and a Thistle growing from one branch:

With the accession of the Hanover dynasty in the early 18th century, personal badges ceased to be borne by British monarchs:


Royal Standard of England[edit]

The Royal Banner of England 1198 – 1340
  • Heraldry Edit ref: (b)

Stephen2nd (talk) 23:06, 19 January 2009 (UTC)


The Royal Standard of England, in favour during Tudor times, was a narrow, tapering swallow-tailed flag, of considerable length, used mainly for pageants. English Standards had the cross of St. George at their head; then the heraldic device, badge or crest, with its motto. These did not bear the coat of arms.

Arms are displayed on banners. Royal Banners are often confused with Royal Standards. It is the Royal Banner which flies above the place where the sovereign is in residence. The Royal Standard of England has the motto: Dieu et mon droit, which is divided into two bands: Dieu et mon and Droyt.[1]


DIEU ET MON: In chief a coronet, and in base an irradiated cloud:

DROYT: Quarterly: 1 & 4: An irradiated cloud: 2 & 3: A coronet:


DIEU ET MON: Two suns in splendour:

DROYT: Four suns in splendour:


DIEU ET MON: In chief a rose gules, and in base another argent:

DROYT: In chief two roses gules, and in base as many argent:


  • Henry V: Arms: The Cross of St. George: Argent and azure: A Swan with wings displayed argent, beaked gules, membered sable, ducally gorged and chained or, between three stumps of trees, one in dexter chief, and two in base of the last:

DIEU ET MON: Two tree-stumps in pale or:

DROYT: Five tree-stumps, three in chief, and two in base:


  • Henry V: Arms: Cross of St. George: Argent & azure: Heraldic Antelope at gaze argent, maned, tufted, ducally gorged & chained or, chain reflexed over the back, between four roses gules:

DIEU ET MON: Two roses in pale gules:

DROYT: Five roses in saltire gules:


  • Henry VII: Arms: The Cross of St. George: Argent and vert: A Dragon gules, between two roses of the last in chief, and three in base, argent:

DIEU ET MON: A rose gules in chief, rose argent in base:

DROYT: In chief three roses gules, in base two argent:

Commonwealth[edit]

PAX QUAERITUR:

BELLO: The field promiscuously strewed with the letters O.P. or:

Scotland[edit]

Earl of Mar (1875): Chiefs Standard: Arms: The Scottish Saltire of Scotland: Demi Lion in chief, on a Cap of Maintenance ermine in base:

JE PENSE: A hand from a Cap of Maintenance ermine, couped at the wrist, holding a dagger erect, it’s blade within an Earls coronet in chief:

PLUS: Demi Lion in chief on Cap of Maintenance ermine in base:

See Also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Boutell's Heraldry: Frederic Warne & Co Ltd. 1973. ISBN: 0723217084.