Chess Opening Theory/1. e4/1...c6/2. d4/2...d5/3. Nc3/3...dxe4/4. Nxe4/4...Nf6/5. Nxf6/5...gxf6

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Bronstein-Larsen Variation
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation(FEN)

rn1qkb1r/pp2pp1p/2p2p2/8/3P4/8/PPP2PPP/R1BQKBNR

Caro-Kann Defence:Bronstein-Larsen Variation[edit]

Black has voluntarily opted for an inferior kingside pawn structure and a practical necessity of castling queenside, but also has some compensation in the form of the open g-file for the rook and unusually active play for the Caro-Kann. It is generally considered somewhat more unsound than 5...exf6, but former top-10 player Bent Larsen employed it with some success during the 1970s.

Theory table[edit]

For explanation of theory tables see theory table and for notation see algebraic notation.

1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Nf6 5. Nxf6 gxf6

6
c3
Nf3
Bc4
Ne2
Be2
Be3
g3
Qd3
Bf4
Qf3

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References[edit]