Healthy eating habits/Hospitality Workers Nutritional Education

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Background[edit]

Hospitality is as defined the generous reception and entertainment of strangers, visitors and guests (Collins English Dictionary, 2013). Examples of people in hospitality are those who work in a cafe, restaurant, motel, hotel or bed and breakfast. Hospitality workers can vary in trade. Job examples of hospitality workers are receptionists, waiters, cooks, chefs, barristers, bar staff, motel cleaners, managers and more. The majority of hospitality workers are aged 15-34 years old (Timo & Davidson, 2005). For 35.1% of hospitality workers, the highest level of education attained is secondary school (Timo & Davidson, 2005). This nutritional education is aimed at hospitality workers aged 20-35 years, in a variety of trades, for all educational levels.

Food Recommendations[edit]

The amount of serves a day for every food group depends on age, physical activity levels, weight, height and gender.


Recommended Daily Serves

For Adults aged 20-35 (note this is a minimum)

Food Group Male Female Comment
Vegetables 6 5 A serve of Vegetables is a cup of salad, a baked potato or half a cup of cooked vegetables
Fruit 2 2 A serve of fruit is one medium fruit, such as an apple or a small banana or two small fruits such as kiwi fruit
Grains/Cereals 6 6 A grain/cereal can be bread, rice and pasta. A serve is a slice of bread, half a cup of oats or half a cup of cooked pasta
Meat/vegetarian alternative 3 2.5 A serve of meat is 65grams of red meat, 85grams of poultry or 175grams of tofu.
Dairy 2.5 2.5 A serve of dairy is a cup of milk, 2 slices of cheese or 200grams of yoghurt
See brochures and go to this website for more information www.eatforhealth.gov.au

Australian Guide to Healthy Eating's Guidelines[edit]

Everyone, including hospitality workers, should follow the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE) because it promotes health and wellbeing for all Australians (NHMRC, 2013). It is the basis for health and nutrition. The AGHE have the 5 following guidelines:

  • Guideline 1: To achieve and maintain a healthy weight, to be physically active, and choose nutritious food and drinks to meet your energy needs
  • Guideline 2: To enjoy a wide variety of nutritious foods from all 5 food groups everyday. Enjoy eating plenty of vegetables, fruit, wholegrain, lean meats and dairy (see above for recommended amounts of each). Also drink plenty of water.
  • Guideline 3: Limit foods that contain added salt and sugars. Limit alcohol and saturated fats
  • Guideline 4: Encourage breast feeding
  • Guideline 5: Prepare food and store it safely. (NHMRC, 2013)
  • See this website for more information [1]

Ways to Increase Fruit and Vegetables consumption[edit]

Many may be worried they do not consume enough fruit and vegetables to meet the recommendations. Here are some easy tips to increase your fruit and vegetable intake that can be incorporated in the busy work schedule of hospitality workers:

  • Add berries or banana to breakfast cereal
  • Cut up carrots, capsicum, cucumber, celery or other vegetables and pack it as a snack
  • Add salad to sandwiches
  • Ask for salad instead of fries when eating at work or when out for lunch
  • Grate vegetables such as carrot, zucchini or celery into sauces, such as marinara
  • Dip some fruit into your favourite yoghurt
  • Buy fruit smoothies instead of milkshakes

Quick and Easy Snacks[edit]

We all live busy lives, but hospitality workers may have a different roster compared to 9-5 office workers. Sometimes people on shift work need something quick to eat. Snacks are part of an everyday, healthy diet. They help bridge nutritional gaps and increase feelings of satiety and sustained energy release to keep up with busy schedules. Quick snacks don't have to be unhealthy. Here are some ideas on quick, easy and nutritious snacks.



  • Dip and vegetables
  • Wholegrain crackers and low fat cheese
  • Low fat yoghurt
  • Low fat muffins, such as bran. Home made is best
  • Air popped popcorn
  • Fruit. Can be fresh, canned or dried
  • Nuts and seeds. Note only in small portions.
  • Low fat smoothies, with yoghurt and fresh fruit

References[edit]

Hospitality. (n.d.). Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition. Retrieved: http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/hospitality?showCookiePolicy=true

National Health and Medical Research Council. (2013). Australian Dietary Guidelines 1-5. Retrieved from: http://www.eatforhealth.gov.au/guidelines/australian-dietary-guidelines-1-5

National Health and Medical Research Council. (2013.) Australian Dietary Guidelines. Retrieved from: http://www.eatforhealth.gov.au/guidelines/australian-guide-healthy-eating

Timo, N., & Davidson, M. (2005). A survey of employee relations practices and demographics of MNC chain and domestic luxury hotels in Australia. Employee Relations, 27(2), 175-192

[1] [2] [3]

[4]

  1. Hospitality. (n.d.). Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition. Retrieved: http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/hospitality?showCookiePolicy=true
  2. National Health and Medical Research Council. (2013). Australian Dietary Guidelines 1-5. Canberra: National Health and Medical Research Council.
  3. National Health and Medical Research Council. (2013.) Australian Dietary Guidelines. Retrieved from: http://www.eatforhealth.gov.au/guidelines/australian-guide-healthy-eating
  4. Timo, N., & Davidson, M. (2005). A survey of employee relations practices and demographics of MNC chain and domestic luxury hotels in Australia. Employee Relations, 27(2), 175-192.