Florence Earle Coates Guide-Book/D

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Däi Nippon. (Apart from all) The Independent (as "Däi Nipon") v. 59 no. 2966 p. 785 (5 October 1905); 1909 p. 98; 1916 v. 1 p. 171. Lines 5, 8, 10, 12, 19, 22, 29, 32, 33, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 45, 46:

——with half-awakened look [1905]
——with half-averted look [1909, 1916]

But a new dread [1905]
For a strange dread [1909, 1916]

——uncomforted [1905]
scarce comforted [1909, 1916]

And when—— [1905]
But when—— [1909, 1916]

——of her strange hunger taught [1905]
——of her new hunger taught [1909, 1916]

Then we beheld [1905]
Then earth beheld [1909, 1916]

Yet she has won [1905]
And yet she won [1909, 1916]

Has not exacted final penalties [1905]
Did not exact remorseless penalties [1909, 1916]

Nor forced—— [1905]
Nor force—— [1909, 1916]

She has revealed—— [1905]
She full-revealed—— [1909, 1916]

Has gained—— [1905]
And gained—— [1909, 1916]

Choosing to give herself, as war departs [1905]
Choosing, as war should from her realms depart [1909, 1916]

Destructive war,—to the enduring Arts [1905]
To give herself to the enduring Art [1909, 1916]

Which were her own at birth [1905]
That was her own at birth [1909, 1916]

O, great Japan [1905]
Ah, great Japan [1909, 1916]

Hast shown thyself magnanimous—— [1905]
Approved thyself magnanimous—— [1909, 1916]

The World, that long has felt—— [1905]
The World, that long had felt—— [1909, 1916]

A seventh stanza is present in the 1905 version, but omitted from subsequent versions:

This is her day!
  War-clouds no longer lower
Above her, in her sun's resplendent ray
  Revealed,—as wise as dread: for not that hour
When, once impregnable, Port Arthur fell,
Nor that of which a vanished fleet might tell,
  So loud proclaimed her power!

Daphnis. (Hail, Solitude! hail, maiden coy and sweet!) 1898 p. 43; 1916 v. 1 p. 230. Lines 43, 53, 72:

——how could he brook [1898]
——ill could he brook [1916]

Thou didst not offer—— [1898]
Thou didst not proffer—— [1916]

Incertain fears—— [1898]
Uncertain fears—— [1916]

Dawn. (In Orient mystery) North American Review v. 196 no. 684 p. 646 (November 1912); 1912 p. 56; 1916 v. 2 p. 156. Lines 7, 11, 13, 16, 19, 28, 29, 31, 34:

Awaking—— [1912, 1916]
Awaiting—— [1912]

Half veil and half disclose [1912]
Half hide and half disclose [1912, 1916]

And living things—— [1912]
When living things—— [1912, 1916]

Yet hours there be [1912, 1916]
Yet, ah, there moments be [1912]

——before thy dim-lit shrine [1912, 1916]
——before thy sun-lit shrine [1912]

Harkens while soft-ascending lays [1912]
Hearkens the most celestial lays [1912, 1916]

——curtain drawn [1912]
——curtains drawn [1912, 1916]

Wistful beholds—— [1912]
Yearning beholds—— [1912, 1916]

And in its pure ray soothed and blest [1912]
And in its ray composed and blest [1912, 1916]

A line from the North American Review version is omitted from subsequent versions; it follows line 28:

Combine the most celestial praise

Dearth. (As one who faring o'er a desert plain) The Smart Set v. 25 no. 4 p. 62 (August 1908); 1909 p. 81; 1916 v. 1 p. 189. A first stanza appears in the 1908 Smart Set version, but is omitted from subsequent versions:

As one who thirsting waits, while mocking him
  The waves o'erleap his shattered vessel's brink;
And, drifting on, life's cup but once to brim,
  Fain to sheer depths would sink—
So everywhere beholding love neglected,
Carelessly set aside, despised, rejected,
  I faint for a pure draught not mine to drink.

Death. (I am the key that parts the gates of Fame) The Century Magazine v. 36 no. 4 p. 527 (August 1888); 1898 p. 122; 1916 v. 2 p. 250.

Deathless Death.—In Memory of Richard Watson Gilder The Outlook v. 94 no. ? p. 31 (1 January 1910); 1912 p. 14; 1916 v. 1 p. 47. Instances of "thy" and "thine" replaced by "your" and "yours" in 1916 version. Lines 31, 58:

——we falter in thy praise [1910]
——we falter in our praise [1912, 1916]

We lay amidst the laurel on thy brow [1910]
We lay amidst the laurel for thy brow [1912]
We lay amidst the laurel for your brow [1916]

A Débutante. (At last, for weariness) Lippincott's Monthly Magazine v. 45 no. ? p. 440 (March 1890); 1898 p. 102. Lines 1, 4, 5, 6, 17:

From very weariness [1890]
At last, for weariness [1898]

Than perfumes hived in flowers [1890]
Than honey hived in flowers [1898]

Or than those songs which—— [1890]
Or than those notes which—— [1898]

Break forth in rapturous worship—— [1890]
Are shyly fluted forth in worship—— [1898]

And still forbore to blame [1890]
Forbearing blame [1898]

Delilah. (Evermore I hear my name) The Independent v. 53 no. 2726 p. 489 (28 February 1901); 1904 p. 88; 1916 v. 2 p. 133. Lines 7, 10, 11, 13, 15:

And the pomps of Palestine [1901]
All the pomp of Palestine [1904, 1916]

And while all our streets are gay [1901]
And when most I should be gay [1904, 1916]

For my triumph, swift my sight [1901]
For my triumph,—lo! my sight [1904, 1916]

And the boding voices say [1901]
And accusing voices say [1904, 1916]

But, tho mortals—— [1901]
But though mortals—— [1904, 1916]

Demeter. (Thou, thou hast seen the child I seek!) 1904 p. 131; 1916 v. 2 p. 149. Line 4: "eyes" to "eye"; line 11: "amid" to "mid."

A Descant. (When Spring comes tripping o'er the lea) Lippincott's Monthly Magazine v. 45 p. 907 (June 1890); 1898 p. 36; 1916 v. 2 p. 30. Line 9:

And the yellow snow-drop dances [1890]
And the faery snowdrop dances [1898]
And the yellow-snowdrop dances [1916]

The Difference. (Had Henley died, his course half run) The Century Magazine v. 63 no. 6 p. 910 (April 1902); 1904 p. 36.

Didst Thou Rejoice? (Didst thou rejoice because the day was fair) Lippincott's Magazine v. 35 p. 191 (February 1885); 1898 p. 12; 1916 v. 2 p. 144.

Ditty: "My True Love's Eyes". (My true-love's eyes are a surprise) The Independent (as "My True-Love's Eyes") v. 47 no. 2414 p. 327 (7 March 1895); 1898 p. 23; 1916 v. 1 p. 153. Written in Germantown, PA. "Wo" (1895) to "Woe" (1898, 1916).

Divination. (How do you know the Spring is nigh) 1912 p. 76; 1916 v. 1 p. 186.

The Dream Beautiful. (see My Dream)

Dream the Great Dream. (Dream the Great Dream, though you should dream—you, only) The Pathfinder v. 5 no. 6 p. 1 (June 1911); 1912 p. 112; 1916 v. 2 p. 256.

Dreyfus (If thou art living, in that Devil's Isle)

Dreyfus (France has no dungeon in her island tomb)

Dryad Song

Du Maurier