Florence Earle Coates Guide-Book/D

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Däi Nippon. (Apart from all) The Independent (as "Däi Nipon") v. 59 no. 2966 p. 785 (5 October 1905); 1909 p. 98; 1916 v. 1 p. 171. Lines 5, 8, 10, 12, 19, 22, 29, 32, 33, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 45, 46:

——with half-awakened look [1905]
——with half-averted look [1909, 1916]

But a new dread [1905]
For a strange dread [1909, 1916]

——uncomforted [1905]
scarce comforted [1909, 1916]

And when—— [1905]
But when—— [1909, 1916]

——of her strange hunger taught [1905]
——of her new hunger taught [1909, 1916]

Then we beheld [1905]
Then earth beheld [1909, 1916]

Yet she has won [1905]
And yet she won [1909, 1916]

Has not exacted final penalties [1905]
Did not exact remorseless penalties [1909, 1916]

Nor forced—— [1905]
Nor force—— [1909, 1916]

She has revealed—— [1905]
She full-revealed—— [1909, 1916]

Has gained—— [1905]
And gained—— [1909, 1916]

Choosing to give herself, as war departs [1905]
Choosing, as war should from her realms depart [1909, 1916]

Destructive war,—to the enduring Arts [1905]
To give herself to the enduring Art [1909, 1916]

Which were her own at birth [1905]
That was her own at birth [1909, 1916]

O, great Japan [1905]
Ah, great Japan [1909, 1916]

Hast shown thyself magnanimous—— [1905]
Approved thyself magnanimous—— [1909, 1916]

The World, that long has felt—— [1905]
The World, that long had felt—— [1909, 1916]

A seventh stanza is present in the 1905 version, but omitted from subsequent versions:

This is her day!
  War-clouds no longer lower
Above her, in her sun's resplendent ray
  Revealed,—as wise as dread: for not that hour
When, once impregnable, Port Arthur fell,
Nor that of which a vanished fleet might tell,
  So loud proclaimed her power!

Daphnis. (Hail, Solitude! hail, maiden coy and sweet!) 1898 p. 43; 1916 v. 1 p. 230. Lines 43, 53, 72:

——how could he brook [1898]
——ill could he brook [1916]

Thou didst not offer—— [1898]
Thou didst not proffer—— [1916]

Incertain fears—— [1898]
Uncertain fears—— [1916]

Dawn. (In Orient mystery) North American Review v. 196 no. 684 p. 646 (November 1912); 1912 p. 56; 1916 v. 2 p. 156. Lines 7, 11, 13, 16, 19, 28, 29, 31, 34:

Awaking—— [1912, 1916]
Awaiting [1912]

Half veil and half disclose [1912]
Half hide and half disclose [1912, 1916]

And living things—— [1912]
When living things—— [1912, 1916]

Yet hours there be [1912, 1916]
Yet, ah, there moments be [1912]

——before thy dim-lit shrine [1912, 1916]
——before thy sun-lit shrine [1912]

Harkens while soft-ascending lays [1912]
Hearkens the most celestial lays [1912, 1916]

——curtain drawn [1912]
——curtains drawn [1912, 1916]

Wistful beholds—— [1912]
Yearning beholds—— [1912, 1916]

And in its pure ray soothed and blest [1912]
And in its ray composed and blest [1912, 1916]

A line from the North American Review version is omitted from subsequent versions; it follows line 28:

Combine the most celestial praise

Dearth. (As one who faring o'er a desert plain) The Smart Set v. 25 no. 4 p. 62 (August 1908); 1909 p. 81; 1916 v. 1 p. 189. A first stanza appears in the 1908 Smart Set version, but is omitted from subsequent versions:

As one who thirsting waits, while mocking him
  The waves o'erleap his shattered vessel's brink;
And, drifting on, life's cup but once to brim,
  Fain to sheer depths would sink—
So everywhere beholding love neglected,
Carelessly set aside, despised, rejected,
  I faint for a pure draught not mine to drink.

Death. (I am the key that parts the gates of Fame) The Century Magazine v. 36 no. 4 p. 527 (August 1888); 1898 p. 122; 1916 v. 2 p. 250.

Deathless Death.—In Memory of Richard Watson Gilder The Outlook v. 94 no. ? p. 31 (1 January 1910); 1912 p. 14; 1916 v. 1 p. 47. Instances of "thy" and "thine" replaced by "your" and "yours" in 1916 version. Lines 31, 58:

——we falter in thy praise [1910]
——we falter in our praise [1912, 1916]

We lay amidst the laurel on thy brow [1910]
We lay amidst the laurel for thy brow [1912]
We lay amidst the laurel for your brow [1916]

A Débutante. (At last, for weariness) Lippincott's Monthly Magazine v. 45 no. ? p. 440 (March 1890); 1898 p. 102. Lines 1, 4, 5, 6, 17:

From very weariness [1890]
At last, for weariness [1898]

Than perfumes hived in flowers [1890]
Than honey hived in flowers [1898]

Or than those songs which—— [1890]
Or than those notes which—— [1898]

Break forth in rapturous worship—— [1890]
Are shyly fluted forth in worship—— [1898]

And still forbore to blame [1890]
Forbearing blame [1898]

Delilah. (Evermore I hear my name) The Independent v. 53 no. 2726 p. 489 (28 February 1901); 1904 p. 88; 1916 v. 2 p. 133. Lines 7, 10, 11, 13, 15:

And the pomps of Palestine [1901]
All the pomp of Palestine [1904, 1916]

And while all our streets are gay [1901]
And when most I should be gay [1904, 1916]

For my triumph, swift my sight [1901]
For my triumph,—lo! my sight [1904, 1916]

And the boding voices say [1901]
And accusing voices say [1904, 1916]

But, tho mortals—— [1901]
But though mortals—— [1904, 1916]

Demeter. (Thou, thou hast seen the child I seek!) 1904 p. 131; 1916 v. 2 p. 149. Line 4: "eyes" to "eye"; line 11: "amid" to "mid."

A Descant. (When Spring comes tripping o'er the lea) Lippincott's Monthly Magazine v. 45 p. 907 (June 1890); 1898 p. 36; 1916 v. 2 p. 30. Line 9:

And the yellow snow-drop dances [1890]
And the faery snowdrop dances [1898]
And the yellow-snowdrop dances [1916]

The Difference. (Had Henley died, his course half run) The Century Magazine v. 63 no. 6 p. 910 (April 1902); 1904 p. 36.

Didst Thou Rejoice? (Didst thou rejoice because the day was fair) Lippincott's Magazine v. 35 p. 191 (February 1885); 1898 p. 12; 1916 v. 2 p. 144.

Ditty: "My True Love's Eyes". (My true-love's eyes are a surprise) The Independent (as "My True-Love's Eyes") v. 47 no. 2414 p. 327 (7 March 1895); 1898 p. 23; 1916 v. 1 p. 153. Written in Germantown, PA. "Wo" (1895) to "Woe" (1898, 1916).

Divination. (How do you know the Spring is nigh) 1912 p. 76; 1916 v. 1 p. 186.

The Dream Beautiful. (see My Dream)

Dream the Great Dream

Dreyfus (If thou art living, in that Devil's Isle)

Dreyfus (France has no dungeon in her island tomb)

Dryad Song

Du Maurier