Florence Earle Coates Guide-Book/B

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A Ballad of a Drum. (The Austrians at Arcola) The Delineator (as "The Ballad of a Drum") v. 64 no. ? p. 934 (December 1904); 1904 p. 49; 1916 v. 1 p. 85. Lines 6, 22, 29, 36:

(One-fourth their strength) had come [1904]
(A fourth their strength) had come [1904, 1916]

Amidst the battle's hum [1904]
Amid the battle's hum [1904, 1916]

Who, thinking Frenchmen in the rear [1904]
Who hearing Frenchmen in the rear [1904, 1916]

Seems good to-day as then [1904]
Is wholesome now as then [1904, 1916]

The Band of the Titanic. (Up, lads! they say we've struck a berg, though there's no danger yet) Lippincott's Monthly Magazine v. 90 no. 535 p. 115 (July 1912); 1912 p. 52; 1916 v. 2 p. 152. Lines 11, 14:

——we'll give them such a song [1912]
——we'll play them such a song [1912, 1916]

Oh, we were never needed—— [1912]
O we were never needed—— [1912, 1916]

Base-Born. (My parents had great joy, I wis) 1912 p. 94; 1916 v. 1 p. 94. Line 13:

They vowed when pleasure brimmed the cup [1912]
They vowed when pleasure filled the cup [1916]

Be Thou My Guide. (Be Thou my guide, and I will walk in darkness) Lippincott's Monthly Magazine v. 50 no. ? p. 782 (December 1892); 1898 p. 28; 1916 v. 1 p. 162. Line 3:

——amidst desert sadness [1892, 1898]
——amid desert sadness [1916]

Beatrice before Death. (The day, from slumber waking, dawns most fair) The Minaret v. ? no. ? p. ? (June 1916); 1916 v. 1 p. 188.

Beauty's Path. (All ugliness wears on its brow the brand) The Outlook v. 89 no. 17 p. 946 (22 August 1908); 1909 p. 56; 1916 v. 2 p. 106. Line 13:

'Tis only by ascending one may come [1908, 1909]
'Tis only by ascending we may come [1916]

Beethoven. (He cursed the day that he was born) 1904 p. 59; 1916 v. 1 p. 115.

Before the Dawn. (I looked on beauteous forms, as I lay dreaming) Putnam's Monthly & the Reader v. 4 no. 6 p. 655 (September 1908); 1909 p. 27; 1916 v. 1 p. 78. Lines 6, 23:

——as nobly sweet [1908, 1916]
——so nobly sweet [1909]

Who, as I think—— [1908, 1909]
Who, so I think—— [1916]

Before the Hour. (Untimely blossom! poor, impatient thing) Lippincott's Monthly Magazine v. 47 no. ? p. 790 (June 1891); 1898 p. 19; 1916 v. 1 p. 22. Lines 10, 14:

——from balmy Arcady [1891]
——from dewy Arcady [1898]
——from any Arcady [1916]

——should not live to see [1891]
——should never live to see [1898, 1916]

Belgium. (I had a dream of Greatness; and I saw) The Bellman v. 25 no. 636 p. 325 (21 September 1918).

Benjamin Franklin. (Franklin! our Franklin! America's loved son!) The Reader v. 7 no. 4 p. 418-19 (March 1906); 1909 p. 12; 1916 v. 2 p. 15.

Bereft. (Death took away from me my heart's desire) The Reader v. 10 no. 1 p. 95 (June 1907); 1909 p. 84; 1916 v. 1 p. 146.

Beside a Pleasant Shore. (I lay upon my narrow bed) 1909 p. 61; 1916 v. 2 p. 165.

Betrothal. (Both your hands? ... What mean they, dear?) 1904 p. 13; 1916 v. 1 p. 69.

Better to Die. (Better to die, where gallant men are dying) 1912 p. 33; 1916 v. 1 p. 218; 1917. Lines 9, 10:

More worth than doubtful—— [1912]
Are better worth than—— [1916, 1917]

They win new life—— [1912]
And they win life—— [1916, 1917]

Beyond. (Had we the present—only that, no more!) 1909 p. 40; 1916 v. 2 p. 222.

"Blessèd". (Blessèd: so have they named her. With just pride) The Century Magazine v. 68 no. 4 p. 650 (August 1904); 1904 p. 139; 1916 v. 1 p. 110. Line 20:

Remembering how glorious the price [1904]
Remembering her service and the price [1904, 1916]

The Brave. (It is not the desert lonely) Harper's Magazine v. 130 no. 779 p. 714 (April 1915).

Breathless We Strive. (Breathless we strive, contending for success) The Century Magazine v. 68 no. 5 p. 803 (September 1904); 1904 p. 118; 1916 v. 1 p. 90.

Britannia. (I am calling together my sons) 1916 v. 2 p. 202.

Brook-Song: To the Spring. (O beauty! vision of forgotten gladness!) The Outlook (as "The Brook's Song to Spring") v. 62 no. 1 p. 49 (6 May 1899); 1904 p. 3; 1916 v. 1 p. 35. Lines 2, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 15, 17, 18, 19, 20, 23, 24:

Promise of all the years, that ne'er betrays [1899]
Fulfillment of a dream that ne'er betrays [1904, 1916]

I dreamed not—— [1899]
I knew not—— [1904, 1916]

The snows and frosts of winter, long departed [1899]
For snows and frosts of winter, new-departed [1904, 1916]

Seemed leaden on my breast—— [1899]
Still held my will in thrall—— [1904, 1916]

Your goodness—— [1899]
Your promise—— [1904, 1916]

Then, soft as music—— [1899]
But soft as music—— [1904, 1916]

——when lone I lay and dying [1899]
——when lone I seemed and dying [1904, 1916]

Along my banks—— [1899]
Now by my banks—— [1904, 1916]

They gently nod their heads, and smile at me [1899]
In fragrant loveliness they smile on me [1904, 1916]

But, ah! I hasten to the river—— [1899]
But I must hasten to the river—— [1904, 1916]

The river will lead onward to the sea [1899, 1916]
The river leadeth ever to the sea [1904]

But sweeter seems the murmur—— [1899]
But sweeter is the murmur—— [1904, 1916]

——onward to the sea [1899, 1916]
——ever to the sea [1904]

The Brook's Song to Spring. (see Brook-Song: To the Spring)

Buffalo: September 6, 1901. (A Transient city, marvelously fair) The Independent v. 53 no. 2758 p. 2389 (10 October 1901); 1904 p. 174; 1916 v. 1 p. 138. Written in Germantown, PA.

The Burial of Robert Louis Stevenson at Samoa. (Where shall we lay you down to rest?) The Outlook v. 69 no. 2 p. 137 (14 September 1901); 1904 p. 148; 1916 v. 1 p. 89.

By the Conemaugh: (May 31, 1889). (Foreboding sudden of untoward change) The American v. 18 no. 463 p. 154 (22 June 1889); 1898 p. 34. Last line:

But I cannot take them away from Him! [1889]
But I cannot hide them away from Him! [1898]

A fourth stanza is present in the 1889 version, but omitted from the 1898 version:

"O Life, from the fire-swept mould
  Arise now forms of beauty;
Out of the waters cold
  Diviner thoughts of duty;
The sunlight gleams where hath swept the tide,
And flowers blossom as flames subside!