Cookbook:Fireweed Scones

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Cookbook | Ingredients | Recipes

Fireweed … a Traditional Spring & Summer food

Harvest[edit]

  • Mt. Shuksan & Mt. Baker
  • Spring & Summer (July-September)
  • Cut off the sideshoots

Nutrition[edit]

  • Excellent source of vitamin A, B & C
  • Good source of Iron and Protein

Preservation and storage[edit]

  • Air dry for two days and store in a container (cool dry place)
  • Wash then air dry, store in covered container in refrigerator
  • Can be stored up to 24 months, in dry conditions

Vinegar Recipe[edit]

  • 2 cups fireweed blossoms and buds
  • 1 cup rice or white wine vinegar

Procedure[edit]

  1. Rinse blossoms in a colander and let dry.
  2. Place blossoms in a sterilized jar and pour vinegar over the top.
  3. Place mixture in a dark place and allow it to steep for 3 to 4 weeks. Strain vinegar through a strainer or a paper coffee filter.
  4. Store in the refrigerator. For longer storage, process in a boiling water bath for 5 minutes. 3 cups boiling water

Scones Recipe[edit]

  • 2 cups flour
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 5 tablespoons butter
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1 egg yolk
  • ½ cup fireweed blossoms

Procedure[edit]

  1. Mix dry ingredients together.
  2. Cut the butter into five pieces and cut into dry ingredients until crumbly.
  3. Mix sour cream and egg yolk together and mix with dry ingredients until all ingredients are combined. Dough will be sticky.
  4. Turn out onto a floured surface and sprinkle blossoms on top.
  5. Knead lightly (only about 10 times) to mix flowers in.
  6. Pat out into a square about ¾ inch thick.
  7. Cut into four squares and cut each square diagonally to make eight scones.
  8. Bake at 400°F for 12 to 15 minutes.

References[edit]

  1. Utah State University Cooperative Extension. (2011). Fireweed. Utah State University Cooperative Extension.
  2. Retrieved from http://extension.usu.edu/rangeplants/htm/fireweed/2Shebitz, D. (2003, April 16).
  3. Plant data sheet. Retrieved from http://depts.washington.edu/propplnt/Plants/epilobium.htm
  4. Dinstel, R., & Shallcross, L. (2011). Fireweed.
  5. Extension Faculty Health, Home and Family Development. Retrieved from http://www.uaf.edu/ces/publications-db/catalog/hec/FNH-00106.pdf