Cookbook:Durian

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Cookbook | Recipes | Ingredients | Fruit| Basic foodstuffs

Durian

Durian (Durio) is a green, spiny fruit from Southeast Asia. This "King of Fruits" has a complex, rich flavor and an intense odor which many find offensive. The fruit's stench has caused it to be banned from public places in some countries and has caused evacuations. Durians can sometimes be found in normal supermarkets in Western countries, frozen and thickly wrapped in plastic.

A durian is opened by splitting it along natural sections. You might be able to see them on the outside as places where the spines run parallel. A durian can be forced open with the hands. Though not needed, a sturdy knife can be helpful to get things started. A durian will start to open itself when it is really ripe. Once opened, a durian should be eaten quickly.

Durian fruit is used to flavour a wide variety of sweet edibles such as traditional Malay candy, ice kachang, rose biscuits, cakes, and, with a touch of modern innovation, ice cream, milkshakes, mooncakes and even cappuccino. Pulut Durian is glutinous rice steamed with coconut milk and served with ripened durian. In Sabah, red durian (D. dulcis) is fried with onions and chilli and served as a side dish.[1] Tempoyak refers to fermented durian, usually made from lower quality durian that is unsuitable for direct consumption.[2] Tempoyak can be eaten either cooked or uncooked, is normally eaten with rice, and can also be used for making curry. Sambal Tempoyak is a Sumatran dish made from the fermented durian fruit, coconut milk, and a collection of spicy ingredients known as sambal.

Notes[edit]

  1. http://www.sabahtravelguide.com/culture/default.ASP?page=trad_cuisine (URL accessed 3 March 2006)
  2. http://www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~durian/rec/recipe.htm (URL accessed 3 March 2006)

Durian recipes[edit]