Cookbook:Cajun cuisine

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Cajun cuisine is a style of cooking originating in Louisiana, mainly from the Acadian (Cajun) area of the state (the "Acadian triangle", ranging from western Texas to eastern Mississippi, with the north point being mid-Louisiana). While it is similar to Louisiana Creole cuisine in that it has adapted to local ingredients, and while there are many overlapping dishes, such as gumbo, it differs in its cooking style -- Creole tends to use classical French cooking techniques, whereas Cajun tends to use rustic, provincial French cooking techniques.

Starting in the 1980s, Cajun influence became important, spurred by the popular restaurant of Chef Paul Prudhomme. A national interest in Cajun cooking developed, and many tourists went to New Orleans expecting to find Cajun food there (being unaware that the city was culturally and geographically separate from Acadiana). Entrepreneurs opened or rebranded restaurants to meet this demand. The "New New Orleans Cooking" of celebrity chef Emeril Lagasse includes both Cajun and Creole dishes. In his writings and TV shows, Lagasse both draws the distinction between Cajun and Creole and explains where they overlap.

However, authentic Cajun cuisine is centered around Lafayette, Louisiana. Cochon de lait and Boudin Blanc are examples of Louisiana Cajun Cuisine.