Chess Opening Theory/1. e4/1...e5/2. Nf3/2...f5/3.Nxe5/3...Qf6/4. Nc4/4...fxe4/5. Nc3

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< Chess Opening Theory‎ | 1. e4‎ | 1...e5‎ | 2. Nf3‎ | 2...f5‎ | 3.Nxe5‎ | 3...Qf6‎ | 4. Nc4‎ | 4...fxe4
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Latvian Gambit
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation(FEN)

rnb1kbnr/pppp2pp/5q2/8/2N1p3/2N5/PPPP1PPP/R1BQKB1R

Moves: 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 f5 3. Nxe5 Qf6 4. Nc4 fxe4 5. Nc3
ECO code: C40
Parent: Latvian Gambit

Latvian Gambit, Leonhardt Variation[edit]

5. Nc3[edit]

White's c3-knight is threatening to capture on e4 hitting the queen on f6, and taking advantage of this diversion to retreat safely to c3. Were the queen not on f6, Black could turn the tables after Nxe4 with ...d5! picking up a knight. So the queen must move again. In the old days of the Leonhardt Variation, 5...Qg6 was the move, defending e4 and pressuring g2. The modern preference is 5...Qf7, renewing the threat of ...d5.


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References[edit]

  • Nunn's Chess Openings. 1999. John Nunn (Editor), Graham Burgess, John Emms, Joe Gallagher. ISBN 1-8574-4221-0.
  • Batsford Chess Openings 2 (1989, 1994). Garry Kasparov, Raymond Keene. ISBN 0-8050-3409-9.