Chess Opening Theory/1. e4/1...e5/2. Nf3/2...Nc6/3. Bb5/3...a6/4. Ba4/4...Nf6/5. O-O/5...Nxe4/6. d4/6...exd4/7. Re1/7...d5/8. Nxd4/8...Bd6

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< Chess Opening Theory‎ | 1. e4‎ | 1...e5‎ | 2. Nf3‎ | 2...Nc6‎ | 3. Bb5‎ | 3...a6‎ | 4. Ba4‎ | 4...Nf6‎ | 5. O-O‎ | 5...Nxe4‎ | 6. d4‎ | 6...exd4‎ | 7. Re1‎ | 7...d5‎ | 8. Nxd4
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Ruy Lopez:Riga Variation
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation(FEN)

r1bqk2r/1pp2ppp/p1nb4/3p4/B2Nn3/8/PPP2PPP/RNBQR1K1

Ruy Lopez:Riga Variation[edit]

With her last move White created the dual threats Nxc6 (bxc6 Bxc6+ winning the exchange) and f3. Can either of these still be played?

It turns out that 9. f3 allows perpetual check, as it removes the option of driving away a Black queen from h4 by playing g3.

9. Nxc6 it is, then.


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References[edit]