Chess Opening Theory/1. e4/1...e5/2. Nf3/2...Nc6/3. Bb5/3...a6/4. Ba4/4...Nf6/5. O-O/5...Nxe4/6. d4/6...exd4/7. Re1/7...d5

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< Chess Opening Theory‎ | 1. e4‎ | 1...e5‎ | 2. Nf3‎ | 2...Nc6‎ | 3. Bb5‎ | 3...a6‎ | 4. Ba4‎ | 4...Nf6‎ | 5. O-O‎ | 5...Nxe4‎ | 6. d4‎ | 6...exd4‎ | 7. Re1
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Ruy Lopez:Riga Variation
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation(FEN)

r1bqkb1r/1pp2ppp/p1n5/3p4/B2pn3/5N2/PPP2PPP/RNBQR1K1

Ruy Lopez:Riga Variation[edit]

8. Nxd4 keeps the threats coming while recovering a pawn (White is two pawns down, remember).

8. Bg5 aims to eliminate the f8-bishop. It allows Black to break at least one of the pins against her king, but may still be good enough for an edge. ...f6 in response can get complicated.

8. c4 tries to pressure the center and eliminate one of black's d pawns. If black chooses to take en passant with ...dxc3, white can respond Nxc3, putting another attacker on the pinned e4 knight. The response 8...Bb4 9.cxd5 Bxe1 10.Qxe1 Qxd5 11.Bb3 Qf5 is more advisable for black.

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References[edit]

Nunn, John (ed.), et al. (1999). Nunn's Chess Openings. Everyman Chess. ISBN 1-85744-221-0.