Chess Opening Theory/1. e4/1...c6/2. d4/2...d5/3. e5/3...Bf5

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Caro-Kann Defence - Advance Variation
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation(FEN)

rn1qkbnr/pp2pppp/2p5/3pPb2/3P4/8/PPP2PPP/RNBQKBNR

Caro-Kann Defence - Advance Variation[edit]

This line is the most common response to the 3. e5, the Advance Variation of the Caro-Kann, which has gained popularity after having previously been widely regarded as inferior for many years, owing chiefly to the strategic demolition that Aron Nimzowitsch (playing as White) suffered at the hands of José Capablanca in one of their games at the New York 1927 tournament:

The Advance Variation has since been revitalized by aggressive lines such as the Bayonet Attack (4.Nc3 e6 5.g4) favored by Latvian Grandmaster Alexei Shirov or the less ambitious variation (4.Nf3 e6 5.Be2 c5 6.Be3) popularized by English Grandmaster Nigel Short.

Theory table[edit]

For explanation of theory tables see theory table and for notation see algebraic notation.

1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 Bf5

4
Nc3
e6
Nf3
e6
h4
Be3
c3
Nd2
c4
Bd3
Bxd3 -=
Ne2
g4
f4
Be2
a3
h3
Bd2

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References[edit]