Chess Opening Theory/1. e4/1...c5/2. Nf3/2...Nc6/3. d4/3...cxd4/4. Nxd4/4...Nf6/5. Nc3/5...d6

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< Chess Opening Theory‎ | 1. e4‎ | 1...c5‎ | 2. Nf3‎ | 2...Nc6‎ | 3. d4‎ | 3...cxd4‎ | 4. Nxd4‎ | 4...Nf6‎ | 5. Nc3
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Classical Sicilian
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation(FEN)

r1bqkb1r/pp2pppp/2np1n2/8/3NP3/2N5/PPP2PPP/R1BQKB1R

Classical Sicilian[edit]

5...d6[edit]

Blacks move 5...d6 protects the recently developed knight from being attacked. A pawn move is thus in order, since both knights are developed to good squares, and the Bishop on c8 now has the option, but not the obligation, to develop to a good square once white makes known his intentions.

Of all the responses for white, Bg5 is perhaps the best, and should be expected from a strong opponent. It pins the king knight, prepares for queenside castling, and it is the prelude to the Richter-Rauzer Attack (named after Vsevolod Alfredovich Rauser[1]).

Theory table[edit]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 d6

6 7 8
Richter-Rauzer Bg5
e6
Qd2
a6
O-O-O
Bd7
+=
Sozin Bc4
e6
Be3
Be7
Qe2
O-O
=
Boleslavsky Be2
e5
Nb3
...
=
f3
e5
=
Be3
Ng4
=

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References[edit]

  • Batsford Chess Openings 2 (1989, 1994). Garry Kasparov, Raymond Keene. ISBN 0-8050-3409-9.