Chess Opening Theory/1. d4/1...Nf6/2. c4/2...g6/3. Nc3/3...Bg7/4. e4/4...d6/5. f3/5...O-O/6. Be3

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< Chess Opening Theory‎ | 1. d4‎ | 1...Nf6‎ | 2. c4‎ | 2...g6‎ | 3. Nc3‎ | 3...Bg7‎ | 4. e4‎ | 4...d6‎ | 5. f3‎ | 5...O-O
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King's Indian Defence
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation(FEN)

rnbq1rk1/ppp1ppbp/3p1np1/8/2PPP3/2N1BP2/PP4PP/R2QKBNR

King's Indian Defence[edit]

6. Be3[edit]

White defends the d4 pawn, which is usually the weakest in the Sämisch formation. Black now has a variety of options - usually he wants to strike in the centre with ...e5 or even the gambit line ...c5. The latter, although it gives up a pawn, gives black a lead in development with plenty of open lines and white's extra pawn is doubled, limiting its usefulness. In practice, black scores very well with the gambit line and it is partially due to it that the Sämisch is not quite as popular as it once was.

Theory table[edit]

For explanation of theory tables see theory table and for notation see algebraic notation

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. f3 O-O

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References[edit]