Chess Opening Theory/1. d4/1...Nf6/2. c4

From Wikibooks, open books for an open world
Jump to: navigation, search
Indian Defence
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation(FEN)

rnbqkb1r/pppppppp/5n2/8/2PP4/8/PP2PPPP/RNBQKBNR

Indian Defence[edit]

2. c4[edit]

2.c4 strengthens White's control of the center, particularly the important d5 square. It also allows White's queenside knight to develop to the active c3 square without blocking the c-pawn.

Black has a number of possibilities at this point:

  • 2...e6 - This move is solid and flexible. Depending on how white plays, black will end up in a Queen's Indian, Nimzo-Indian, Bogo-Indian, Queen's Gambit Declined, or a Benoni.
  • 2...g6 - This tends to be more aggressive (and riskier), though still solid if one knows the important strategic points. Black has the choice to move into a King's Indian Defence (KID) (regardless of white's play) or possibly a Grünfeld if white plays 3. Nc3 and black wishes.
  • 2...c5 - This will likely end up being a Benoni (often aggressive, risky), Benko-gambit (positional pawn sacrifice by black on queenside), a symmetrical English (a bit quieter, but active pieces), or even a Tarrasch QGD (active for both sides).
  • 2...d6 - This is the so-called "Old Indian," and it can either transpose into a KID or follow less popular lines with a strategy similar to the KID.
  • 2...e5 - The Budapest Gambit. It has a unique character and often allows black active play. White usually gives the pawn back eventually, and usually gets a slightly better position, but black can do well against the ignorant white player.
  • 2...d5 - The Marshall Defence. This is not the best idea, though not an absolute trap. Several opening encyclopedias give this a clear advantage to white if played right.

Theory table[edit]

For explanation of theory tables see theory table and for notation see algebraic notation.

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4

2 3 4 5 6
King's Indian Defence c4
g6
Nc3
Bg7
e4
d6
Nf3
O-O
Be2
e5
=
Grunfeld Defence ...
...
...
d5
cxd5
Nxd5
e4
Nxc3
bxc3
Bg7
=
Benoni Defence ...
c5
d5
e6
Nc3
exd5
cxd5
d6
e4
g6
+/=
Queen's Indian Defence ...
e6
Nf3
b6
a3
Bb7
Nc3
d5
cxd5
Nxd5
+/=
Bogo-Indian Defence ...
...
...
Bb4+
Bd2
Qe7
g3
Nc6
Nc3
Bxc3
+/=
Nimzo-Indian Defence ...
...
Nc3
Bb4
e3
O-O
Bd3
d5
Nf3
c5
=
Catalan Opening ...
...
g3
d5
Bg2
dxc4
Nf3
Be7
O-O
O-O
=
Black Knights' Tango ...
Nc6
Nf3
e6
a3
d6
Nc3
g6
e4
Bg7
+/=
Budapest Gambit ...
e5
dxe5
Ng4
Bf4
Nc6
Nf3
Bb4+
Nbd2
Qe7
+=
Old Indian Defence ...
d6
Nc3
e5
Nf3
Nbd7
e4
Be7

+/=
Marshall Defence ...
d5
cxd5
Nxd5
Nf3
Bf5
Qb3


+/=

When contributing to this Wikibook, please follow the Conventions for organization.

References[edit]

  • Batsford Chess Openings 2 (1989, 1994). Garry Kasparov, Raymond Keene. ISBN 0-8050-3409-9.