Chemical Sciences: A Manual for CSIR-UGC National Eligibility Test for Lectureship and JRF/Analytical Chemistry- Separation Techniques

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Analytical chemistry is the study of the separation, identification, and quantification of the chemical components of natural and artificial materials. Qualitative analysis gives an indication of the identity of the chemical species in the sample and quantitative analysis determines the amount of one or more of these components. The separation of components is often performed prior to analysis. Analytical methods can be separated into classical and instrumental. Classical methods (also known as wet chemistry methods) use separations such as precipitation, extraction, and distillation and qualitative analysis by color, odor, or melting point. Quantitative analysis is achieved by measurement of weight or volume. Instrumental methods use an apparatus to measure physical quantities of the analyte such as light absorption, fluorescence, or conductivity. The separation of materials is accomplished using chromatography or electrophoresis methods. Analytical chemistry is also focused on improvements in experimental design, chemometrics, and the creation of new measurement tools to provide better chemical information. Analytical chemistry has applications in forensics, bioanalysis, clinical analysis, environmental analysis, and materials analysis.

Instrumental methods of analysis[edit]

Atomic absorption and emission spectroscopy including ICP-AES, UV- visible spectrophotometry, NMR, mass, Mossbauer spectroscopy (Fe and Sn), ESR spectroscopy

Chromatography[edit]

Spectroscopic Electro- And Thermoanalytical Methods[edit]

Spectroscopic Electroanalytical Methods :(Coulometry, cyclic voltammetry, polarography amperometry, and ion selective electrodes). Spectroscopic Thermoanalytical Methods : AAS