Business Strategy/The Japanese Challenge

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The Art, Science, and Craft of Decision-Making

The Japanese Challenge
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History of Business Management until the 1970s Gaining Competitive Advantage

By the late 70s people had started to notice how successful Japanese industry had become. In industry after industry, including steel, watches, ship building, cameras, autos, and electronics, the Japanese were surpassing American and European companies. Westerners wanted to know why. Numerous theories purported to explain the Japanese success including:

  • Higher employee morale, dedication, and loyalty;
  • Lower cost structure, including wages;
  • Effective government industrial policy;
  • Modernization after WWII leading to high capital intensity and productivity;
  • Economies of scale associated with increased exporting;
  • Relatively low value of the Yen leading to low interest rates and capital costs, low dividend expectations, and inexpensive exports;
  • Superior quality control techniques such as Total Quality Management and other systems introduced by W. Edwards Deming in the 1950s and 60s.[1]

Although there was some truth to all these potential explanations, there was clearly something missing. In fact by 1980 the Japanese cost structure was higher than the American. And post WWII reconstruction was nearly 40 years in the past. The first management theorist to suggest an explanation was Richard Pascale.

In 1981 Richard Pascale and Anthony Athos in The Art of Japanese Management claimed that the main reason for Japanese success was their superior management techniques.[2] They divided management into 7 aspects (which are also known as McKinsey 7S Framework): Strategy, Structure, Systems, Skills, Staff, Style, and Supraordinate goals (which we would now call shared values). The first three of the 7 S's were called hard factors and this is where American companies excelled. The remaining four factors (skills, staff, style, and shared values) were called soft factors and were not well understood by American businesses of the time (for details on the role of soft and hard factors see Wickens P.D. 1995.) Americans did not yet place great value on corporate culture, shared values and beliefs, and social cohesion in the workplace. In Japan the task of management was seen as managing the whole complex of human needs, economic, social, psychological, and spiritual. In America work was seen as something that was separate from the rest of one's life. It was quite common for Americans to exhibit a very different personality at work compared to the rest of their lives. Pascale also highlighted the difference between decision making styles; hierarchical in America, and consensus in Japan. He also claimed that American business lacked long term vision, preferring instead to apply management fads and theories in a piecemeal fashion.

One year later The Mind of the Strategist was released in America by Kenichi Ohmae, the head of McKinsey & Co.'s Tokyo office.[3] (It was originally published in Japan in 1975.) He claimed that strategy in America was too analytical. Strategy should be a creative art: It is a frame of mind that requires intuition and intellectual flexibility. He claimed that Americans constrained their strategic options by thinking in terms of analytical techniques, rote formula, and step-by-step processes. He compared the culture of Japan in which vagueness, ambiguity, and tentative decisions were acceptable, to American culture that valued fast decisions.

Also in 1982 Tom Peters and Robert Waterman released a study that would respond to the Japanese challenge head on.[4] Peters and Waterman, who had several years earlier collaborated with Pascale and Athos at McKinsey & Co. asked “What makes an excellent company?”. They looked at 62 companies that they thought were fairly successful. Each was subject to six performance criteria. To be classified as an excellent company, it had to be above the 50th percentile in 4 of the 6 performance metrics for 20 consecutive years. Forty-three companies passed the test. They then studied these successful companies and interviewed key executives. They concluded in In Search of Excellence that there were 8 keys to excellence that were shared by all 43 firms. They are:

  • A bias for action — Do it. Try it. Don’t waste time studying it with multiple reports and committees.
  • Customer focus — Get close to the customer. Know your customer.
  • Entrepreneurship — Even big companies act and think small by giving people the authority to take initiatives.
  • Productivity through people — Treat your people with respect and they will reward you with productivity.
  • Value-oriented CEOs — The CEO should actively propagate corporate values throughout the organization.
  • Stick to the knitting — Do what you know well.
  • Keep things simple and lean — Complexity encourages waste and confusion.
  • Simultaneously centralized and decentralized — Have tight centralized control while also allowing maximum individual autonomy.

The basic blueprint on how to compete against the Japanese had been drawn. But as J.E. Rehfeld (1994) explains it is not a straight forward task due to differences in culture.[5] A certain type of alchemy was required to transform knowledge from various cultures into a management style that allows a specific company to compete in a globally diverse world. He says, for example, that Japanese style kaizen (continuous improvement) techniques, although suitable for people socialized in Japanese culture, have not been successful when implemented in the U.S. unless they are modified significantly.

References[edit]

  1. Schonberger, R. Japanese Manufacturing Techniques, The Free Press, 1982, New York.
  2. Pascale, R. and Athos, A. The Art of Japanese Management, Penguin, London, 1981, ISBN 0-446-30784-x.
  3. Ohmae, K. The Mind of the Strategist McGraw Hill, New York, 1982.
  4. Peters, T. and Waterman, R. In Search of Excellence, HarperCollins, New york, 1982.
  5. Rehfeld, J.E. Alchemy of a Leader: Combining Western and Japanese Management skills to transform your company, John Whily & Sons, New York, 1994, ISBN 0-471-00836-2.
« Business Strategy
The Art, Science, and Craft of Decision-Making

The Japanese Challenge
»
History of Business Management until the 1970s Gaining Competitive Advantage