Arabic/Book/Layout

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This is a place for putting a proposal for how the lessons should be set up. How the book should be split up (chapters, units), and what each part of the book will focus on. For example if the pronouns should be learnt before, learning any verbs, would be indicated by a proposal. The proposals can be simple, make sure they are clear.



I propose: that the fundamental, unit. The unit which teaches how to read Arabic, should be worked on the most. And at the same time, the planning of the book (what each chapter/unit will teach), and the sequence of the lesson, and what each lesson will teach should be figured out. Once what a lesson will teach is planned, a link to a page for the lesson should be added to the appropriate unit/chapter. In the page setup for that lesson information on what the lesson would teach should be added.


Hasan Aljudy: I propose that the book should emphasize on learning Arabic through the Arabic alphabet, and rely less and less on transliteration; if we must, then rely on (and provide) sound files(by your own voice, if you must). Readers should become accustomed to reading Arabic words; since unlike English, the pronunciation of most words in Arabic can be inferred from the letters and the Harakat. Once you get yourself acquainted with the rules, (i.e. knowing the differences between the Harakat and the actual vowel letters (alef, waw, ya'), etc.) inferring the pronunciation shouldn't be too hard.


I agree with your proposal, and propose that, the book should not use any transliteration past the 2nd Unit. Any transliteration past the 2nd Unit is not a necessity, transliteration past the 1st Unit will not be necessary either once the 1st Unit is finished. I still think that transliteration is extremely useful, but I do believe we should not rely on it. --TwoThirty 08:11, 31 March 2006 (UTC)