Annotations of The Complete Peanuts/1971 to 1972

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Annotations to The Complete Peanuts: 1971 to 1972 by Charles M. Schulz (Fantagraphics Books, 2009. ISBN 1606991450)

  • p. 49 (April 23, 1971). Herman Hesse was a German-Swiss poet, novelist, and painter, and winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1946. Snoopy's interest in this rather heavy literary figure is meant to contrast amusingly with his former preoccupation with the more lighthearted subject matter of Miss Sweetstory's Bunny-Wunnie books.
  • p. 57 (May 10, 1971). It is almost impossible to convey how huge an impact the movie Love Story had on popular culture when it was released. The book, the movie itself, its theme song, were best-sellers. They were referred to in every media; individuals would talk about it at every occasion. It practically saturated the entertainment space.
  • p. 64 (May 27, 1971). First mention of "Joe Cool". That persona of Snoopy may have had a longer life outside the strip as a merchandising theme (sweaters, posters, etc.) than inside it.
  • p. 87 (July 20, 1971). First appearance of Marcie, without her being named.
  • p. 97 (August 12, 1971). Although commonly despised as a somewhat vulgar feat, crushing an empty can of beer was indeed considered by some a sign of muscular strength. The steel walls of beer cans were then thicker and harder than those of aluminium we have today.
  • p. 107 (September 5, 1971). Many of the first names mentioned by Lucy are from Schulz' own life: "...Lee, and Bill, ..." probably for Lee Mendelson and Bill Melendez, "...Amy, and Jill, and Meredith, ..." are names of Schulz's children, "...Donna" for Donna Mae Johnson, etc.
  • p. 123 (October 11, 1971). First time Marcie is named.
  • p. 163 (January 15, 1972). First mention of "Peppermint" Patty's full name.
  • p. 174 (February 7, 1972). The original series of Star Trek, featuring starship "Enterprise", had disapointing ratings when it first aired between 1966 and 1969. Through syndication, however, its ratings surged and by 1972 it aired in more than 100 American cities.
  • p. 180 (February 21, 1972). "Another unmarried marriage counselor...": 1972 is the year Schulz separated from his wife. The divorce proceedings completed in 1973.
  • p. 186 (March 3, 1972). "Johnny Horizon" was the rugged, outdoorsy mascot of the Bureau of Land Management in the 1970's. Similar to the more well-known Woodsy the Owl and Smokey the Bear, Johnny Horizon encouraged young people to respect and preserve the environment.