Abnormal Sexual Psychology/MOS

From Wikibooks, open books for an open world
Jump to: navigation, search

Abnormal Sexual Psychology

Preface   |   Contributors   |   Manual of Style   |   Warning to Readers   |   Further Reading

ASP MOS[edit]

Style of Writing[edit]

Try to write in a clear, concise style. Use correct psychological terms, but make sure to explain such terms immediately afterward. Avoid interwiki links when possible.

References[edit]

References should use standard MOS formatting, but the bibliography should use APA style.

Templates[edit]

There are three specificalities this text uses.

Informational Template[edit]

{{subst:Template:ASPinfo|Example Title|Example Info}} produces:

Exquisite-khelpcenter.png
Example Title

Example Info

This should be used when blocking text off as separate information. If discussing masochism (sexual arousal from pain) and you want to sidetrack into algonagnia (sexual pleasure and orgasm from pain), you would use it:

Exquisite-khelpcenter.png
Algolagnia and Masochism

It's important to remember that algonagnia is not a paraphilia, but a biological nerve dysfunction. Masochists are aroused by specific kinds of pain, but algolagniacs can be brought to orgasm through pain even if they aren't aroused.

DSM-IV Quote Template[edit]

{{subst:Template:DSMIVinfo|Example Entry|Example Text}} produces:

Application-x-executable.svg
DSM-IV on : Example Entry

Example Text

This is a short cite of the DSM-IV, or content relating to the DSM-IV's stance on a paraphilia. This should ONLY be used when:

  1. to directly quote the DSM-IV in a definition of a scientific term. This cite should be very limited in scope when possible.
  2. to discuss the DSM-IV "viewpoint" on a topic, without a direct cite.
  3. the DSM-IV makes an asseration that is in conflict with mainstream views on the subject. For example, in dealing with Voyeurism:
Application-x-executable.svg
DSM-IV on : Voyeurism

While popular culture likes to describe voyeurs as peeping toms who can't get a date or make significant relationships work, the DSM-IV shows that voyeurism is the most common of all paraphilias, with the highest rate of normal exclusivity out of all paraphilias. At least 55% of men and 30% of women admitted in studies to be aroused by acts that meet the standard of voyeurism. Some argue that this makes voyeurism simply a behavior and not a paraphilia.

Controversial Template[edit]

{{subst:Template:ASPControversy|Example Issue|Example Controversy}} produces:

{{ASPControversy|Example Issue|Example Controversy}

This should be used when there is significant disagreement in professiona psychological circles about a paraphilia , or the view of psychology on a specific cause or trait of a paraphilia. This should be used sparingly. An example dealing with pedophilia would be:

Dialog-warning.svg
Pedophilia and Asexuality : Controversy

There is some research indicating that paraphilia is common among those who, whether by choice or vocation, are restricted from normal sexual activity. DSM-IV does not recognize such a link, but studies are still ongoing.

DSM-IV Direct Cite Template[edit]

Warning: Unless you are very familiar with what is and isn't allowed to be fair use quoted from the DSM-IV, do not use this template or quote directly from the DSM-IV. The DSM-IV is widely avaialble as excerpts on the Internet as long as it is only

  • The diagnostic code
  • The summary
  • The etiology
  • The treatment options

The extended analysis, diagnostic guide, point-by-point criteria, and the like cannot be directly quoted under fair use.

{{subst:Template:DSMCite|example cite}} produces:

Dsmtr.PNG
DSM-IV Direct Quotation

The material below is directly taken from the DSM-IV or the DSM-IV-TR and summarized for clarity. The material excludes the specific diagnostic texts, case summaries, and extended text of the entry, and is as short as possible. The DSM-IV is widely quoted and cited in this manner, and this usage falls under fair use.


example cite


The material cited above comes from the DSM-IV-TR, ©1995-2006, American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc. The full text of the DSM-IV includes associated features, diagnostic tools based on culture, age, and gender features, prevalence, course, and familial pattern of mental disorders. It also covers diagnosis, treatment, and quality of care. The above cited material is a summary of a DSM-IV or DSM-IV-TR entry and should not be used for diagnostic purposes. The full text can be purchased here.

This should only be used in the section that directly speaks about DSM-IV Definitions.

Direct Cites[edit]

(For purposes of Special:Unusedtemplates

Dsmtr.PNG
DSM-IV Direct Quotation

The material below is directly taken from the DSM-IV or the DSM-IV-TR and summarized for clarity. The material excludes the specific diagnostic texts, case summaries, and extended text of the entry, and is as short as possible. The DSM-IV is widely quoted and cited in this manner, and this usage falls under fair use.


{{{1}}}


The material cited above comes from the DSM-IV-TR, ©1995-2006, American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc. The full text of the DSM-IV includes associated features, diagnostic tools based on culture, age, and gender features, prevalence, course, and familial pattern of mental disorders. It also covers diagnosis, treatment, and quality of care. The above cited material is a summary of a DSM-IV or DSM-IV-TR entry and should not be used for diagnostic purposes. The full text can be purchased here.

Application-x-executable.svg
DSM-IV on : {{{1}}}

{{{2}}}

Accessories-text-editor.svg
Citations and References

{{{1}}}

Nuvola apps important.svg
{{{1}}} : Controversy

{{{2}}}